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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I have been finishing a cherry table that I built for our kitchen and had to strip the finish as it was heading in a direction that I was not happy with. This is the first time that I have tried using a dewaxed shellac as a sealing coat under a poly topcoat, so I figured there'll be a learning curve.

My plan is to use Zinsser Seal-Coat as a sealer and then to spray General Finished PolyAcrylic Gloss as a topcoat. Any comments on what to watch for or advice on how to get the best quality finish?

Thanks!
 

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Old School
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Hello all,

I have been finishing a cherry table that I built for our kitchen and had to strip the finish as it was heading in a direction that I was not happy with. This is the first time that I have tried using a dewaxed shellac as a sealing coat under a poly topcoat, so I figured there'll be a learning curve.

My plan is to use Zinsser Seal-Coat as a sealer and then to spray General Finished PolyAcrylic Gloss as a topcoat. Any comments on what to watch for or advice on how to get the best quality finish?

Thanks!
Why use Seal Coat as a sealer? Why not just use your topcoat (thinned some if necessary) as a sealer.




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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I find (through experimenting) that shellac enhances the depth of the finish, unlike poly by itself. I've read up online about shellac under poly and figured I'd give it a try.
 

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I find (through experimenting) that shellac enhances the depth of the finish, unlike poly by itself. I've read up online about shellac under poly and figured I'd give it a try.
IMO, shellac is too soft a finish to have as a base for a topcoat. If you want to enhance the grain, try a 50/50 mix of BLO and Naptha. Wipe it on, wipe it off after a few minutes. Once that cures, you can topcoat.




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If this is your first try with shellac, it can be a problem if you brush it. You might consider padding it on, that's especially good for large flat surfaces. Waterbornes (the polycrylic) can also be a problem, I've only been successful spraying them, but a good brushing technique (which I don't have, apparently) will work.
 

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The sealcoat is a good idea under the water based poly. It will seal the wood so the water doesn't raise the grain and if you use an oil stain provides a barrier coat between the poly and the linseed oil which are incompatible.
 

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The sealcoat is a good idea under the water based poly. It will seal the wood so the water doesn't raise the grain and if you use an oil stain provides a barrier coat between the poly and the linseed oil which are incompatible.
Once oil finishes have cured they can be topcoated.




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Even if the stain isn't cured the sealcoat can be used to accelerate the project. Not everyone is willing to wait three days for the stain to cure.
Using Seal Coat over an oil base that hasn't cured just to get a rushed topcoat on is not the kind of finishing I would do.




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Wood Snob
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I think using the shellac for a seal coat is a great idea. It doesn't go on with a brush so well. But it is very easy to sand so you don't have to be an experienced pro. As mentioned, a rag would be easier and like Steve said it will block water and seal a stain.

Shellac also adheres very well and if it's dewaxed you can top coat almost anything over it. Correct me guys if I'm wrong but it does seem to raise the grain on cherry. But I like to raise the grain at least once and sand it down to finish. For a table top it will greatly help in building a finish.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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Using Seal Coat over an oil base that hasn't cured just to get a rushed topcoat on is not the kind of finishing I would do.








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It wouldn't be any different than putting another finish that is compatible with linseed oil over a wood stain that has only dried a few hours. The sealcoat is compatible with the wood stain and a water based poly will adhere to the sealcoat. I see no reason not to use it.
 

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Wood Snob
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I'm sure I've never let stain cure for 3 days. Besides, shellac is like the wonder finish. I honestly think I could get a good finish on a wet rag with it.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.
 

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It wouldn't be any different than putting another finish that is compatible with linseed oil over a wood stain that has only dried a few hours. The sealcoat is compatible with the wood stain and a water based poly will adhere to the sealcoat. I see no reason not to use it.
Like I said, I wouldn't do finishing like that.



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I've done a couple of table with putting a dewaxed shellac sealer on first then spraying on General Finish Pre-Cat Urethane with good results. The only thing I notice is I put the shellac on with a foam brush and you have to watch it because it will leave ripples so you have to brush it a lot.
 
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