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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,

I just wanted to share my brand-new zero clearance insert for my table saw that I made out of scrap wood flooring left over from a project. It's basically plywood with topped with a bit of smoked Oak.

Fits pretty snugly and looks pretty. I'm sure it will get all jacked up as soon as I start slamming wood through the saw but it's nice because the material is quite resistant to scratching and also very smooth.

Please tell me what you think!

Sorry I think I attached the photos twice. <--total newb here!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
mikeswoods said:
How about posting pictures of the jig you used to make such a nice insert?
Haha what jig? Just kidding. I need to make another for my dado stack so I'll make a video of the process.
 

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What kind of saw do you have? I've made several attempts at zero clearance plates for my craftsman (cheapo $130 model) and all have failed because of how the plates are installed on my saw. I'm thinking I need to make another try and just route out the underside of the plates a bit.
 

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Nice plate. I've made several for my craftsman for different blades and uses and they have all lasted for years.

Frank, is your saw one of those junkie craftsman bench top models? That is what I had for years and it was a real bear to make inserts for. I ended up using 1/4" thick Baltic ply and routing the under side to fit after drilling and counter sinking the screw holes. Then, I added tabs to the other side that slid under the table and stretched over to where they butted against the mounting flange near the mounting screws to give it extra strength. It was great for rip and cross cuts as long as the blade was at 90 degrees. Forget about cutting at an angle with it. For that you need a different insert. Then one for thin kerf blades, another for dado blades (at least one, I have several for different blade thicknesses).

Even my current craftsman flex drive (a full sized contractor type) has to have the inserts routed to fit because of the way it mounts the insert.

Such a simple thing and it requires a bunch of extra steps to make it work. Craftsman tools are such wonderful things. :laughing:
 

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Looks good. I just got done making one for my Craftsman saw. I took the dado insert and cut a piece of 1/4 inch plywood the exact same size as the existing opening. After I made sure it was perfectly flush on the top I use hot glue on the bottom. This holds the insert in place. I then bring the blade up through the wood insert. Works great and usually last quite a while. When you need to replace the hot glue will peal off and you can insert a new one.
 
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