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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I have an older Craftsman 1HP motor with the shafts coming out of both ends. I wont to use it to power a 6" jointer, but it wont fit in the jointer stand with both shaft ends sticking out, if I cut off the unused side it will fit. What I would like to know is if I cut it off will it have any affect on the motor?
 

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No. Cutting should not affect amp draw, balance,rpm,reliability,etc. I'd cut it off, clean up the stub (I'd suggest a fun way to do this but not looking for trouble here),clamp the motor SECURELY to a stable surface and light it up just to make sure it's happy before putting into jointer. Good luck.
 

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Hi

I have an older Craftsman 1HP motor with the shafts coming out of both ends. I wont to use it to power a 6" jointer, but it wont fit in the jointer stand with both shaft ends sticking out, if I cut off the unused side it will fit. What I would like to know is if I cut it off will it have any affect on the motor?
Never saw a motor the shaft would come out like that. If that is what it's doing you will have to put a shaft collar on the shaft on both sides of the motor to hold it in place before you cut it off.
 

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It's just me, but I don't like doing stuff to machines that is irreversible. That motor was designed to either drive multiple devices at the same time or be able to easily turn it around so that rotation is reversed. By cutting off the shaft, those uses are for ever eliminated for you or anyone else that might acquire it later on. Again. That's just me.
Can the stand or cabinet be modified to accommodate the shaft?
 

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where's my table saw?
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Hi

I think your thinking of a different type of motor, this is what I have.

View attachment 444905
Those are the BEST motors Craftsman had made for them even though it's an "open frame" style,
They are bring $100 + on Ebay these days. I have one on a Craftsman 1/2" shaper and the other came off my Craftsman100 table saw, waiting for it;' next home.
I would NOT alter it by cutting the shaft off!
You could sell it as is, OR find an application where it will work "as is". JMO.
When I gave my old 6" Craftsman jointer to a friend it had a Harbor Freight 1 HP Farm Duty motor on it. Cost me under $100, on sale.
Do NOT use "compressor duty" motors on woodworking equipment, although it's tempting because of the price.
Grizzly has reasonable prices on pretty darn good motors:

Harbor Freight 1 HP farm duty electric motor:
 

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Which jointer planer do you have?
Emerson made those for sears all the way up to the late 90s on the jointer planer with double and shafts.
that is original style from the 50s and 60s. The frame numbers changed over time.
Motor pdf 113.19040
 

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I'm afraid I must ask for a bit of indulgence: I should have started my earlier reply with a few basic questions before suggesting that lopping the unused end off that motor would be OK. Anyway, I've seen the picture and would like to know if the motor is a Totally Enclosed Non-Vented(TENV)? A jointer is pretty dusty so a vented motor-slots in the end cases-may not be a good idea. Also, is 3450 rpm appropriate for this application? Are the frame and shaft dimensions the same as the original? Is 1hp sufficient (probably but have to ask)?
If this motor is thought to be suitable I would still favor cutting it. It's not my place to presume anybody’ s financial sensitivity but I'm not rich and still would lose no sleep over what I suspect is negligible risk. Do what you think best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Hi

It will be powering an old Davis and Wells 6" Jointer I believe is from the late 30's to early 40's. As for the motor shaft the deed is done. Don't worry to much about the motor, there relatively easy to find for cheap here in Washington state for some reason, I picked up 3 for next to nothing, of course they came with 3 different tablesaws, but still.

Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring Gas
 

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@knothead1 This motor was never used on a grinder.

All the Emerson 113 motors are open, not totally enclosed.
in the above PDF, it does describe it as an open motor and they were 3450 RPM, dual voltage and the frame type changed somewhat over the years to slightly smaller. Most of the shafts were 5/8 x 2“ exposed. This particular motor would have roller bearings in it.
The latter motors were sleeve bearing type motors they require to be oiled. They’re easy to spot as they have little yellow caps on each side each.
 

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where's my table saw?
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When I bought my first table saw in 1960, I started saving all the Craftsman catalogs,
Here's some photos from the 1960 Craftsman catalog. The cover, the saw, the motor listing, and the actual motor:
I was going to guess at the weight of the motor at 40lbs, it's a heavy beast, but the listing calls out the shipping weight as 46 lbs.
The saw list says the saw with the 1 HP motor cost $150.00. I bought that with my high school graduation gift money.
 

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These days when a lot of people have too much money double shafted motors are not that important, I can remember my father using them, one motor powered two tools, sometimes a belt would be run off on one of them and other times it would be more expedient to just run both tools. The other god send for him was a portable mount where a motor could be quickly moved from one machine to another. To his generation electric motors were a huge step up from a Fairbanks Morse chugging in the background running a multi-pulleyed jackshaft.
 
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