Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This has got to be one of the most agonizing things of beginning a workshop. I've read the others in the thread and know it is so.

My workshop will be on the top floor of a new addition. The width will be around 24' and the length could be up to 53', in theory, if I took up the entire floor. Naturally the wife would beat me senseless upon the first suggestions of this so I won't mention it. I have to balance getting enough room in the shop to be useful while still enabling the rest of the top floor space to be enough.

Right now I have the floor plan at 24'x16'. I could increase that but I don't want to if it won't be used.

I know that the types of projects and equipment that would be needed control the needed shop size but at these beginning stages I don't know what I'll evolve into.

From you fine people all I would like to ask is those with a workshop close to the size I've "reserved" (24'x16'), do you find it's doable or is it so maddening you go crazy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I lived in a small condo a few years back. The garage was 16 x 22. I couldn't get my truck in there (atleast not if i wanted to close the door.) but I was able to arrange all my tools. At first it was okay, but as time went on and projects built up it was nothing more than a hassle. I found the most frustrating thing was the tool I needed next was on the other side of the project, and I had to shimmy around the sides to get to it, then shimmy back to the other side to do my work. I'd suggest increasing it to a more 'squared off' dimension to alleviate some headache.

Sure the wife won't like it, but you'll have more room to hide from her! :laughing:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input. And more room to hide doesn't work. Her side-to-side footwork is good enough for her to corner me and work the body until I drop my hands. Then it's all over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
512 Posts
Well I know one thing, we ALL out grow our shops but you know mine 20 x 20 would be just fine if I didn't have all my At work junk and tools and left over paint in there. Draw it out on graph paper with your tools layed out and see what kind of room you would have and then throw in some extra tools you might get later and check it again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
From yet another woodworker with a shop that turned out to be smaller than I need. Problem is that shops don't automatically grow as you acquire more "stuff."

Your size could be workable, especially if you have "mobile tools." When I built mine I knew I wanted a big work table, so it's 4' x 8'. I built it to be about 1/8" under the height of my table saw, which has a mobile base. So I can wheel the saw over and use the worktable for a run-out surface. Modified the planer stand to the right height and put locking casters on it, so it works too. The jointer was equipped with the same locking casters so I can push it against the wall and wheel it out to joint long stuff. I didn't feel good about building the base up on something that heavy to match the work table.

Vertical lumber storage would be another must. I built one that allows me to store lumber so the wide dimension of the wood is perpindicular to the wall. That way it stays straight to prevent bowing, and I can pull out the one I'm after without going thru a pile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've been looking at the configurations the shop could be to maximize space. Having some mobile machines is something I will be looking at heavily. For sure the "side machines", being planer, jointer, etc., will be mobile. And really, anything I don't feel will be in steady use will be mobile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Our main shop is 24x36', and it is crowded, and we had to add on a finishing room so we didn't have to stop work to do the finishing. The finishing room is 12x16', and we are getting ready to break ground on another addition of 12x16' to house the lathes--all four of them!!!

Sheesh!! Too many toys!!!

Nancy (66 days)
 

·
Forgotten but not gone
Joined
·
5,674 Posts
Well I hate to say it but my 40 x 50 is so unorganized it seems crowded.

One thing I have to do soon is put in a finish room. Nancy I don't know where to begin. i have read a few brief articles but how do you like yours and what would you do different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I will have some drying racks but I think some plastic hanging around them will do find for my needs. A small paint booth is needed as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
No matter what size you build it, it won't be big enough down the road. I wanted to build mine 26 x 36, the wife vetoed that, so I ended up 24 x 30. As my repertoire grew, my space shrunk. My wife, even has admitted that I need more room, but now adding on is going to be a real PITA.

Build it as big as you can afford to build, then be as frugal with your space as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Build it as big as you can afford to build, then be as frugal with your space as possible.
Sound advice. My issue is I can make it as large as I need, but will sacrifice the size of the room adjoining it. So I have to find my "magic number" and go with it.

An update to this is that I am going to make the attic my paint and finish room. I'm going to use the rafters that allow walking down the middle and use the space to smartly construct an area to paint and then use the area between the rafters as racks to let things sit and dry. I think that will really free up some space in my actual workshop. I have to look into the reality of being able to store paint, etc. in that area as I suspect it will be warmer, as attics usually are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Her side-to-side footwork is good enough for her to corner me and work the body until I drop my hands. Then it's all over.
:laughing:, ex boxer here...don't step straight back, keep your chin down and elbows in tight. The bad part is she knows where you sleep. If she is a dirty fighter, a feller could wake up with a black eye :huh:.

Shop organization I have found is an evolution thing. A good "original" plan is a sound idea, but you will still be dragging them around to fit a new tool in (and there are always new tools). My suggestion would be make sure you have plenty of amps to run the tools, put in a separate breaker box for the shop. Leave yourself room for "expansion".

The bad part is from what I am understanding is you are making the shop up stairs, that sucks. Dragging lumber up is a pain, dragging finished projects down is even worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
:laughing:, ex boxer here...don't step straight back, keep your chin down and elbows in tight. The bad part is she knows where you sleep. If she is a dirty fighter, a feller could wake up with a black eye :huh:.

Shop organization I have found is an evolution thing. A good "original" plan is a sound idea, but you will still be dragging them around to fit a new tool in (and there are always new tools). My suggestion would be make sure you have plenty of amps to run the tools, put in a separate breaker box for the shop. Leave yourself room for "expansion".

The bad part is from what I am understanding is you are making the shop up stairs, that sucks. Dragging lumber up is a pain, dragging finished projects down is even worse.
Yeah she cheats in fights. That's why I love her.

Yes my workshop is upstairs and will suck on occasion. I'm sure when I am carrying lumber upstairs and more when I'm carrying a project back down the stairs I will be cursing. But.... It's either that or use half of the garage for a workshop so I think I have the better of the two. And a separate breaker box is in the plans. If I was to pop a breaker and kill the blender while the wife is making margaritas then the fuse is lit and she's coming at me from all angles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top