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I've been dreading cutting up this piece of 2" thick hard maple for a new workbench. My Forrest WWII Combination Blade always seems to burn thick wood no matter what I do on my (yes, underpowered) table saw.
So finally I bought a Freud 10" 24T dedicated rip blade and WOW! I wish I had used this years ago. I was hesitant not because of the cost (about $40) but because it's a nuisance to change blades.
For anyone else who has problems ripping on the TS, it's definitely worth the $ and effort for a rip blade.
 

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Couldn't have said it better myself. The right blade makes a huge difference....get rid of your stock blade, off name, junk blade, and buy a proven performer.
 

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mine still makes me nervous when I fire up my cabinet saw. sounds like a jet engine starting; but man it cuts wood like a hot knife.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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It's annoying to change blades.....but the right blade really does make all the difference.
 

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Sawdust Maker
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When it comes to changing blades, I am very glad my TS has an arbor lock. Changing blades is fast and easy. Takes less than 30 seconds. I'm not sure why all saws don't come with arbor locks.

To answer the OP question, a dedicated rip blade will have less teeth and a profile that is meant for ripping. I am not a fan of combo blades. They usually do rips and crosscuts o.k. but don't do either one very well. Dedicated blades are the way to go. Especially when you start working with thicker hardwoods. The right saw is just as important. I cut a lot of 8/4 + hardwood. That's why I run a 5hp saw. Having the right tools makes all the difference in the world.

It is reasons like this that I don't recomend cheap tools unless they are capable of performing the work that person is going to do. I would much rather save up my money and wait until I can afford the proper tool for the job. Everyone of us is capable of saving money and waiting.

Mike Darr
 

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Possibly the chore will be lessened from now on as you know what the blade design is meant to do?
I don't mind as I know what's coming next!
The next stunner will be the effects of a serious plywood blade.

I save my 72T x 10" TC blade for cuts that need it. Hacking 2x4 for yard works hardly justifies the quality.

Actually, I think that the blade differences are most noticible in a portable/Skil saw app.
They are such gutless wonders when compared with a TS, a rip blade won't bog the motor.
 

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Chester's Gorilla
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I think I might be able to make a case to my wife that having dedicated blades for different functions is a good reason to have a second table saw. It worked in getting a second band saw!
 

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I got a Freud Diablo 1024 table saw rip blade for Christmas, as per my asking for it, and I cannot wait to try it. It looks like a normal, full kerf blade but the package says thin kerf on it. Looks like 1/8 to me. I put a Freud Diablo thin rip blade on my circular saw and it's so nice I can't even imagine a better one. It looks less than 1/16 wide. That's the reason I wanted the 1024 for my table saw. Aside from it being thicker than I thought it would have been, I'm looking forward to trying it.

EDIT -- I just measured its tooth width and the best I could see it looks about 7/64. I can clearly see it's over 3/32 by about 1/2 way to the full 1/8 mark. That doesn't seem to be thin kerf to me. If so, then I guess every saw I have has a thin kerf blade on it. My Kobalt miter saw has a 3/32 blade on it.
 
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