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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So.....you do get what you pay for in bits.......

I bought this porter cable set of forstner bits for 25 bucks or so......a spoon may be sharper......time to shop for new bits.....

Bits.jpg bits 2.jpg
 

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Why not sharpen those. All it takes is a small diamond hone and a little effort. Just sharpen the sides, they are what does the cuttin. I was going to throw away a dull one and happened to find a video by captian eddie showing how to sharpen them.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
keith long said:
Why not sharpen those. All it takes is a small diamond hone and a little effort. Just sharpen the sides, they are what does the cuttin. I was going to throw away a dull one and happened to find a video by captian eddie showing how to sharpen them.

I may have to look for that video...
 

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I have a set from HF that I got like 8 years ago. 16 in a set for $22 and they have worked. Fine. Now if I used them more often they may not hold up as good as say a $200 set of Freud bits. Now are the Freud bits 8 times better? I doubt it.

It's been said more then once on here. HF stuff is hit and miss but ever since the son stole the company from his father, I have noticed a downfall in quality. Man that was hard to post without laughing. :laughing: seriously bits and there heavy duty stuff use to be worth the risk at one time but not so sure anymore. My point is don't get mad at me if you go buy there forstner bits and they are crap also. :laughing:

As stated by Keith try and sharpen those or bring them back. You may ave gotten some that were returned and resold as new. I would suggest saying they were damaged/ bad so they don't resell them again.

Problem with sharpening them and I'm no expert. The higher quality bits have better steel which hold the grind longer. The cheaper ones may need sharpening more often.

The $200 set would be good if you used multiple sizes and used them daily. However for occasional use of just one or two bits sharpen the cheaper ones and buy specific size better bits as needed.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
GeorgeC said:
How many dozens of bits have you tried so that you have a basis for the "worst ever" statement?

George
A few....but from the performance of the set I got I'm pretty comfortable making that statement.
 

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That's too bad, Ryan.
My PC set was sharp out of the box. Still sharp, now.
Mine came in a wood box and I paid $50 for mine, though.
 

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John
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I haven't been very happy with Porter Cable router bits either.:thumbdown:
 

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That's too bad, Ryan.
My PC set was sharp out of the box. Still sharp, now.
Mine came in a wood box and I paid $50 for mine, though.
I have a similar set in a wooden box that have mostly been fine. They work well in hardwood and white pine but for whatever reason I've had some trouble with them in yellow pine. Perhaps I need to sharpen them, or perhaps the resin was at fault.
 

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Dull bits can be sharpened, as noted. However, technique is important to maintaining sharpness for a longer period.
I always drill at my press' lowest speed. I believe that's 650 rpm. In fact, because changing speeds is such a PIA on my press, it stays at that speed. High speeds will cause higher heat and may even render the bit totally useless.
Always pull the bit out frequently during a boring operation. Same reason as above.
Some will disagree but, I keep a can of "Dri-Lube" handy and spray the bit before starting the bore and, during the operation if it's a thick or especially hard piece of stock. The difference in the sound and in the pressure required is very noticeable.
 

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Sawdust Creator
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Bit speed is directly related to material type and hole diameter....there are all kinds of charts available for that.
 

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where's my table saw?
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There are several types of Fosrtners

Each type requires a different sharpening method. Here's a link to the various methods and sharpening kits:
http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=utf-8&fr=ytff1-tyc-inbox&p=sharpening%20Forstner%20bit&type=

Here's a video:
http://www.ehow.com/video_4418691_sharpening-forstner-drill-bit.html He is shown sharpening a very large bit, which makes the process easier, but it's easier to see also. He using some specialty wheels for the process and he is in a sharpening shop with those specialty machines.... just saying. We woodoworkers would not ordinarly have that equipment.

here's a good article: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/sharpeningforstnerbits.aspx

I like to make certain there is still a very slight taper as in the factory sharpened bit on the outside of the cutter, but not enough to change it's diameter. I just clean it up on a fine grit belt sander, without grinding away any appreciable amount of material.
 

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Just pull out a file and sharpen them.

Even if they would have been sharp when you bought them, eventually you would have to touch them up.

I got the big cheap HF set, touched them up with a file and they cut great.

Yes, you would think paying extra for Porter Cable they should be sharp out of the box, but they probably came from China too.

I remember at my former place of employment we used to have Greenlee bits but they got dull too and you usually needed to file them because someone would put them back in the cabinet dull.
 

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Forstner bits

I have a couple of sets of these bits in wood cases. My strategy is to replace the inexpensive bits with better quality when they wear out. Since some sizes are used infrequently, I always have a sharp bit when needed. :thumbsup:
 
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