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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the room in my house that I'm going to turn into my workshop has solid concrete everything (floors, ceiling, walls) (well walls are concrete block, but you get the idea).. I saw an episode of new yankee workshop where norm says about all wood walls so that you can hang things anywhere without having to find a stud.. and was wondering if it would be ok to use plywood or osb rather than tongue and groove wood planks like he used (I don't have that kind of capital available to me)..

I'm thinking 1x2 or 1x3 slats on the concrete block screwed in with masonry screws and then 1/2"-3/4" plywood or osb (preferably osb, since it's so much cheaper.. 9 bux for 1/2 inch osb or 25 for 1/2 inch plywood)

any suggestions on the best way to do it, and/or money saving suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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1/2" OSB or plywood for that matter will not hold much of a tool weight wise. Why not just find the studs in the wall where you want to hang something. Using sheet rock. It will look much better also.
 

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Min; Luck has no studs :}:}:}:} look again all masonary.

Luck; Osb is cheaper but not as good as ply. Doesnt hold screws as well. That said said you can also use pegboard in many sections for lighter tools, that is why it was invented :}. Many times a bit more money in the beginning is sooooooooooooo much cheaper farther down the road, trust me:laughing:. OSB and dampness do not like each other.
JackM
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanx

thanx, though dampness isn't an issue.. the entire foundation has been re-wrapped, and sealed, plus, the concrete block on the inside has been stucco'd and painted with a sealant paint (paint before stucco, rather than trying to paint the stucco)..

I'd honestly like to stud the room out and do it that way, but the room now is only 11' wide (11'x22'.. it's directly under a 1 car garage).. I know that 11' isn't much room to work, but you gotta use what you got, right? better 11' than 0' :)
 

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I'm thinking that you normally don't hang anything on the bottom half of your walls. So if you want to cover this area that is where you would save yourself some money and put the cheaper material. Like 3/4" MDF layed on it's side. As for the top half I think I might hang a sheet or two of the pegboard. But I would leave the rest and start checking yard sales and auctions for old upper kitchen cabnets and free standing shelves that I could hang on the walls. Or just lumber to make into shelves. My mind is running away with all the things you can make for tool storage. And if you are farly new to wood working all the things you would learn making these things. You will also have left over lumber from projects you build as time goes by. Of course if you are trying to build a "showroom shop" then I'm not the person you want any thoughts from.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
nope, no showroom shop here.. I wouldn't say I'm new to woodworking, but I wouldn't call myself an expert either.. there are alot of things I would like to build for tool storage.. as for wood storage, I built a 5' walkin closet that's the width of the room (so 5x11).. I have pegboard attached as a "hutch" on my workbench.. but I'd like to build some cabinets for like bandsaw accessories, drill press accessories, etc... so that each tool has a cabinet near it with the stuff I need for that tool.

I just did some pricing, and it'll run me about 250 bux to put 1x3 lats up and then 1x8's vertically on the lats.. which will give me the look, and the support that I want..

I'm going to epoxyshield the floor of the shop as extra protection from moisture.

thanx for the suggestions everyone.. I think I finally have a plan of action.. when/if I actually get around to doing it.. I'll put up pictures.
 

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Hi Luck

Old kitchen cabinets are a great way to get started for cheap. I would also recommend that you get some anti-fatigue mats for the floor. Get the kind you can lift up to clean under. These will really save sore tired feet and legs. Concrete floors are a killer.

Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanx for the tip on the mats...

the cabinets and benches/workspaces aren't the problem, but thanx for the tip.. I just need to figure out what to do with the walls since I don't have anywhere to hang anything at the moment :)
 

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I just had another thought, Luckdragon. There are anchors that you can buy, designed for use with concrete block. If you plan out where you are going to hang your heavier items you could install some of these to carry the heavier weight. I am not sure what they are called, or who makes them, but if you explain to your building supply people what you are wanting to do I am sure they will know what you need.

Gerry
 

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nope, no showroom shop here.. I wouldn't say I'm new to woodworking, but I wouldn't call myself an expert either.. there are alot of things I would like to build for tool storage.. as for wood storage, I built a 5' walkin closet that's the width of the room (so 5x11).. I have pegboard attached as a "hutch" on my workbench.. but I'd like to build some cabinets for like bandsaw accessories, drill press accessories, etc... so that each tool has a cabinet near it with the stuff I need for that tool.

I just did some pricing, and it'll run me about 250 bux to put 1x3 lats up and then 1x8's vertically on the lats.. which will give me the look, and the support that I want..

I'm going to epoxyshield the floor of the shop as extra protection from moisture.

thanx for the suggestions everyone.. I think I finally have a plan of action.. when/if I actually get around to doing it.. I'll put up pictures.
Just a little thought for you
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
that's great.. except for when I have to go into concrete walls :p and I don't want to go putting too many holes in my foundation :) that's why I'm trying to come up with the best way to put solid wood walls up.. I'm thinking 1x8 planks (or tongue/groove), but don't know the best way to fasten them to the concrete.. some kind of strip? like a 1x3 or 1x4? (I don't want to build 2x4 walls, because the shop's only 11' wide.. so I don't have much room to start with)
 

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that's great.. except for when I have to go into concrete walls :p and I don't want to go putting too many holes in my foundation :) that's why I'm trying to come up with the best way to put solid wood walls up.. I'm thinking 1x8 planks (or tongue/groove), but don't know the best way to fasten them to the concrete.. some kind of strip? like a 1x3 or 1x4? (I don't want to build 2x4 walls, because the shop's only 11' wide.. so I don't have much room to start with)
Well lets conceder this for a moment. 3/4 + 3/4 = 1-1/2 on all sides = a loss of 3" in width. 1-1/2 + 1/2" = 2" on all sides = 4" loss in width. Only 1 " total extra loss using 2x4 on flat with 1/2" plywood or OSB. With going this route you could add 1-1/2" Styrofoam for a little extra insulation and have a sturdy wall to boot.
Now going back to the use of 3/4" material, strapping the wall horizontally every 2' and applying 1x8 T&G wood also give you a good wall just not as strong but 3/4 plywood will also work good and you could still put 3/4" styro (if you can get it there). You would use Tapcons and construction glue for the strapping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
very true.. didn't think about using 2x's on the flat side.. was thinking about 2x's the way they are normally used for framing.. which would give me a loss of 8" total (3 1/2+1/2) using the 2x's on the flat is a great idea.. 1, they are cheap.. 2, when I add the ply (or the boards).. I'll still be able to use 2+" nails for the mountings and the like.. genius! :)

thanx a ton!
 

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very true.. didn't think about using 2x's on the flat side.. was thinking about 2x's the way they are normally used for framing.. which would give me a loss of 8" total (3 1/2+1/2) using the 2x's on the flat is a great idea.. 1, they are cheap.. 2, when I add the ply (or the boards).. I'll still be able to use 2+" nails for the mountings and the like.. genius! :)

thanx a ton!
You are very welcome. We here are always intested in before and after pics so it would be nice to see some pics of your project if possible.
 
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