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Do you wear gloves in the workshop?

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When I first started woodworking in high school, we were always taught the safety basics (wear eye/ear protection, don't have loose jewelry, hair, or clothing, etc.). So in my shop at home, I've kept to most of those. I always wear my shop apron and eye/ear protection, but I've also found that I enjoy working with a tight-fitting pair of work gloves. They protect my hands when I'm handling all the woods, adjusting tools, and I've even cut them a few times where they have saved my skin. Almost all the instructions for tools that I have read say "Don't use gloves while operating this product."

My question is, do you wear gloves in your workshop and/or do you believe they are a safety hazard?
 

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A lot depends on what you are doing. If you are just moving wood then it would be alright to wear gloves but running machinery with gloves on can be dangerous. If the machine has the potential to grab the glove and pull your hands in I would leave them off.
 

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God no, never around tools. It only takes seeing the 'after' pictures of someones hand getting dargged into a drill press once to break that habit. The only time I wear gloves is when I'm playing with my heat treat kiln, and that's only because 1500 degrees is a little toasty
 

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where's my table saw?
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Yes and No.

Yes, when handling wood with splinters or when handling or working with hot surfaces.

No, when working around spinning cutters or workpieces... like the lathe, or drill press in certain circumstances. There was a You Tube demo where a piece of cloth was held over the table saw and nothing bad happened .. I think it just cut the cloth,... can't quite remember.

The danger is when it can become wrapped around the cutter or workpiece and draw your body parts into it. The same applies to shirt sleeves or long hair.

You poll needs another category ... "sometimes".
It's not a black or white issue in my opinion, but I don't wear them in the shop..... and I have had some splinters to show for it.

"Never" would have been another good category.
 

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Depends. When I'm cleaning up around the shop or moving lumber around, absolutely. I work faster with them on and don't worry about splinters, spider bites, or just generally getting nastiness on my hands.

I don't usually when I'm using most tools, but when I was using a sled to cut dadoes in pressure treated 4x4's, I did. I'd already gotten one good sliver before I put them on and my hands were in very safe positions.

I could definitely see how they could cause some damage like the drill press example.

On a side note, I've burned through at least 6 pairs of Mechanix brand gloves (not just woodworking). All sorts of styles. I recently decided to try these Ironclad one's from Amazon, but it'll take a couple months before I'll be able to tell how they hold up. Anybody else have any experience with these?
 

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A no-no for puncture wounds as well. Nothing helps get an infection going like dirty fabric getting pushed into a wound. You develop calluses for a reason.
 

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I almost chopped the tip of my finger off because a glove got caught in a pneumatic tire machine. Sucked it right in. Still have the scars, pretty much all the feeling is back.

Now the only time I use power tools and gloves is when I'm breaking down pallets.
 

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A lot depends on what you are doing. If you are just moving wood then it would be alright to wear gloves but running machinery with gloves on can be dangerous. If the machine has the potential to grab the glove and pull your hands in I would leave them off.
I agree with Steve. Working with gloves might be OK when handling large pieces of plywood, glass, veneer, etc. But when grinding hand tools or working with power tools wearing gloves can be dangerous as you lose the tactile touch. Some times a glove can get caught in the saw blade or bench grinder wheel and cause injury! I have seen some accidents taking place like that.
 

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A lot depends on what you are doing. If you are just moving wood then it would be alright to wear gloves but running machinery with gloves on can be dangerous. If the machine has the potential to grab the glove and pull your hands in I would leave them off.
Totally agree. Hand protection is needed when handling wood.

I once rammed an oak splinter (3/16" at t he big end by 1 1/4" long) so deep into my hand I could not pull it out. My next door neighbor was the base emergency room head and he also could not get it out. We wound up going to the emergency room.

He had no problem going to the head of the line.

George
 

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Gloves + rotating equipment = recipe for disaster. That means jointers, planers, drill presses, tablesaws, routers, pretty much any power tool. Even a belt or disc sander can grab your glove and pull your hand in, possibly causing tremendous damage.
 

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FrankC said:
If the question was about wearing gloves while running machinery it would make sense, just in the workshop is a bit ambigious.
I dunno, anytime in the workshop except when required I'd not wear the gloves. It's too easy to think, I'm just going to make one quick cut with these gloves on, and then BAM! Your SawStop goes off like someone threw a hotdog at it.

If I'm working with really rough wood, maybe, but a splinter is easier to deal with than a chopped off finger.
 

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I dunno, anytime in the workshop except when required I'd not wear the gloves. It's too easy to think, I'm just going to make one quick cut with these gloves on, and then BAM! Your SawStop goes off like someone threw a hotdog at it.

If I'm working with really rough wood, maybe, but a splinter is easier to deal with than a chopped off finger.
And never wear flip flops and shorts in the garage just in case you decide to take the Harley for a spin. >:)
 

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FrankC said:
And never wear flip flops and shorts in the garage just in case you decide to take the Harley for a spin. >:)
It's not so much that as it is about complacency. Accidents happen on procedures you've done a thousand times and are on auto pilot. Also, with the old "just a quick cut and I'm done" thing.

Btw, I actually don't allow flip flops in my workshop either.
 

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All the rules in the world will not keep you safe unless common sense is used as well. Handling rough lumber full of splinters bare handed because if you have gloves on you might use your table saw without thinking in my opinion borders upon the ridiculous.

There are many different styles of gloves, there are the $1.49 variety of "one size fits all" that are extremely loose fitting on most hands. Then we have mechanics gloves that are very tight fitting, really not that different than working with bare hands in most cases.

You should never run a machine with any kind of gloves on, that is a given and I have no argument there, I have an argument with generalities that make no sense in the real world.
 

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I have never worn gloves in the workshop. Even unloading melamine....
 
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