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Discussion Starter #1
I live in Northern Ontario. It's starting to get quite cold up here. Couple years back I put a wood stove in my garage, so I could be warm in there in the winter month's. I've started working on my woodworking projects out there, but here's the thing. I only heat up the garage with the wood stove when I'm out there. This may be a stupid question, but is this hot to cold from day to day doing a lot of damage to my wood I'm working on out there, or is it only going to really matter after the wood has been finished?

Thanks.
 

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What I found from the hot/cold/ ambient moisture was more of a problem for exposed metal on my equipment than the wood.
 

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As far as the wood goes the transition should not be a big issue until you are dealing with glue ups and finishing. If it cools back off before a glue is cured the glue might freeze before it forms a good bond. With finishes especially oil based and laquer it has to be warm enough four the solvent to evaporate off. As far a machine tops the best solution I've come up with is vinyl flooring remnants placed on the cast iron surface to prevent condensation.
 

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I found the worst problem was me freezing. I started using a small camping propane heater and it works great.

As others stated, main issue is gluing & finishing. For those tasks, I relocate items indoors for a day or 2, with my wife's permission of course. She usually doesn't say anything. After all, the folding table has her paint projects on it currently...
 

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Our basement is unfinished so I used to take stuff down there to finish but the smell from the poly and laquer would get rough.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok.

Thanks a lot guys. I'm going to do the glue up on my slabs first thing Saturday morning so I will keep it warm in there all day which give the glue time to cure.
 

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Yes, I'm in the same boat. You may want to start the fire earlier and give the wood time to warm up before trying to glue up.

I only have a 4800W electric heater in my insulated garage, but with Time Of Use hydro rates now in effect, daytime (MON-FRI) rates are double that of the night time rate.

That's not bad when it's only a little chilly, but this morning was -20C (-4F), so it takes a while to get everything warmed up. I can't justify running the heat all the time when I only get out there once or twice a week. I've started bringing stuff in a part of my basement for gluing up. Much easier to get a proper cure.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, I'm in the same boat. You may want to start the fire earlier and give the wood time to warm up before trying to glue up.

I only have a 4800W electric heater in my insulated garage, but with Time Of Use hydro rates now in effect, daytime (MON-FRI) rates are double that of the night time rate.

That's not bad when it's only a little chilly, but this morning was -20C (-4F), so it takes a while to get everything warmed up. I can't justify running the heat all the time when I only get out there once or twice a week. I've started bringing stuff in a part of my basement for gluing up. Much easier to get a proper cure.
-20 this morning... We must live close to each other. That's come waaaay too early this year.. lol
 

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The temperature changes can do damage to your tools via condensation and the cancer called rust can take root. You can help alleviate some of the condensation on smaller tools (bits and such) by storing them in wood boxes you can make yourself. Unfinished wood, it absorbs the moisture better. If you have a metal tool box, line or sprinkle the drawer bottoms with some saw dust. IMO saw dust does a better job than silica packs...and your a woodworker...so it's free.
 
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