Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I use my workbench as the outfeed for the table saw. About 30 years ago I built it out of 4x4's (legs) and 2X4's (frame) with a sheet of 3/4"x4'x8' plywood. (top) Over the years it had sagged, and needed to be replaced.

Recently, I tore it down to the 4x4's and started over. First, I read many posts on this forum, in order to learn what others had done. I considered many of the methods, then decided what would work best for my shop, and for how I use the workbench.

I chose to use yellow pine 2x6's for the top framing, and added 2 on 16" centers, as (floor joists). From there, I screwed down a 49"x 97" sheet of 3/4" MDF. My next step would be to attach a sheet of 49"x 97" Milmine, with a 3/8" thickness.

Not wanting to fasten it with nails, staples, or screws, I found the two-sided tape method to be my best bet. Off I went in search of said tape, only to find an item that was just 3/4" wide x 15' long. The cost was about $5. I wanted numerous strips of this on the perimeter, and down the length of my table top. The product I was looking at, just wasn't going to fill the bill.

As I stood there looking at that tape, I came up with an idea to use the much wider, very glue-like, double-sided carpet seam tape. I went over to another section of the store, where I found a box of this exact item, containing 75' of tape, about 2 1/2" in width. The price was about $25.

I purchased all of the material needed, and headed back to the shop, like a man on a mission. All the while, my son (age 30) was wondering what the heck I was going to come up with this time. :blink:

We got it all put together, and laid the strips of carpet seam tape. Now, it was time for the attachment of the Milmine. Chad had one idea, and I explained to him, we'd have a very tough time getting all four corners laid squarely onto the MDF, using his method. I thought for a bit, and decided to use the same method as if we were applying a plastic laminate. For me, I saw an effective method, and a chance to teach Chad something which he had never done.

It went done with ease, and was squared up nicely. We rolled it, clamped it in a few places, and let it set for a few hours. Belt sanding around the outside edges gave a flat surface at the point of edge connection of the two materials. Then, a round over bit in the router, and the task was completed with a finish sander. The two pieces of sheet goods now appear as one.

We were in need of replacing what had been a duplex receptacle, on each of the four legs. Back to the store we went to study our options. A heavy duty power strip was available, in black and yellow color. The wheels started turning in my head, and I decided we needed four.

I used a 2 1/2" wood hawg bit to bore a series of holes in the face of the yellow pine 2x6, then squared the opening with the oscillating tool. The power strips fit decently into the openings, but a bit of trim would be necessary to give it the look I preferred.

This was a great weekend project, and it turned out very satisfactorily.
Thanks to those of you who took the time to share information on how you constructed your workbench tops. It was a great help for me to learn from your successes.

If anyone else is contemplating taking on this job, I'd be glad to share the pictures which were taken, as our project progressed from start to finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
This is nothing fancy, nor does it have all the bells and whistles. I certainly won't be taking it to the County Fair. The workbench is like what I had previously, now stronger, a lot heavier, and has a replaceable top.
 

Attachments

1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top