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Discussion Starter #1
What do you guys use to lube the innards of table saws, etc.? I am about ready to start assembling my Unisaw project. Obviously, I need to keep the gears and shafts lubricated but with something that won't be a sawdust magnet.

I was at Lowe's and saw this DuPont stuff: http://www.lowes.com/pd_213197-39963-D00110101_0__?productId=1059839&Ntt=lubricant&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl__0__s%3FNtt%3Dlubricant It looks interesting as it seems to be wax based, has Teflon and they actually mention table saws in the description (though they may be referring to using it on the table).

Bill
 

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A_shop_and_a_Vette
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Use a dry lubricant. Anything with oil or grease will become a gummy mess and bind things up. Rockler and Woodcraft have it.
 

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The only thing on my table saw that gets lubed is the motor.

I suspect that the constant addition of fine sawdust would actually act as a lubricant on the exposed parts of the saw.


George
 

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I use dry graphite lube. It sprays on black and dries quickly. It doesn't need it that often.
 

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I use dry graphite lube. It sprays on black and dries quickly. It doesn't need it that often.
Are you talking about the dry lube you use on Pinewood Derby Cars?
 

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Old School
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I use dry graphite lube. It sprays on black and dries quickly. It doesn't need it that often.
+1. Dry graphite that doesn't contain silicones will work (check the product). Molybdenum disulphide, MoS2 will also work. Whatever used should be used sparingly, and kept off work surfaces that contact wood.








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Discussion Starter #8
My concern is that a graphite lube wouldn't provide any rust protection. After hours of sandblasting and wire-wheeling on the Unisaw parts, I'd like to avoid rust on the unpainted surfaces. this DuPont product description says:

"Multi-Use Dry, Wax Lubricant
  • Goes on wet to coat parts in a non-oily film but sets up with a dry, wax film to resist dirt build-up
  • Lasts 3 - 5 times longer in friction testing against other leading lubricants
  • Use on any moving part including: garage doors, bicycles, locks, hinges, gates, windows, sliding tracks, wheels, threaded parts, winches, garden equipment, etc
  • Non-staining, silicone-free film protects tools, table saws & other wood working equipment against rust & corrosion"
I think I'll buy a can, spray it on some metal and see how it dries. I figure a thin wax film won't gunk up but will seal the unpainted arn. Since it's silicone-free it might work well for tops, too.

Bill
 

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A_shop_and_a_Vette
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I bought a spray can of 3in1 dry lubricant from NAPA. It dries quickly, and contains no silicone or grease. According to the can it's good on metal, plastic or wood. Graphite would leave a black stain on any unfinished wood it got on.
 

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Scotty D
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