Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
puffessional Scrabbleist
Joined
·
155 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Before tackling the high-pressure sales guy at the local feed and grain (Coastal Farm). I'd like to find out more about them than I do now. I've a fairly hefty stove coming out of the shop but am not sure about what to replace it with. The one recommended by a phone call to CF is around $1000 just for the stove.

My shop is 800 sq ft with ten foot ceiling. It has R-26 insulated sides and top with a concrete floor. One end is a flimsy metal garage door (16' x 8') but it is somewhat protected by another building. We are way above the valley floor so it's a bit colder. Our temp sometimes dips below freezing and stays for a week or two. We rode at 8-10 degrees for about a week and a half last month. It is 22 F at the moment.

The Shraeder/Franklin style is outdated and they don't even sell the same style any more. I have a medium sized Lopi in the house at one end. We have a fireplace and often use it in tandem with the Lopi. The Lopi is sluggish but once going it is REALLY efficient. I wouldn't mind this one outside but the wife nixed that idea.

The ones recommended by the guy who sold us the Lopi are pretty spendy. I was hoping to stay under $1000 for stove, hardware and installation. I really liked the design and space taken up by one of the old railroad car heaters, a variation on the pot belly idea.

Any recommendations? We want to stick with wood heat. I was considering the purchase of about a hundred rabbits. Their fur and warmth would bring the temp up. I'd also wind up with a very soft floor.

TonyM
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,163 Posts
Oh man...

I have been heating the house with wood for about 34 years. The shop is heated with 220V electric industrial space heaters on a concrete floor. I maintain the shop to 50 degrees when I'm not in there and turn it up to 55 when I am. Finishing with anything but lacquer is not possible in that temperature.

So, the slab is your enemy in the winter and your friend in the summer. I took a concrete saw and cut all around the perimeter to make a thermal break between the footing and the slab. The break is necessary to prevent the cold from transmitting in or out. It made a LOT of dust, but I used a dry saw.

The walls are insulated to R19 in 6" studs. The ceiling is R38 in 12" joists, BUT there is an other heated shop space above. Your garage door is like an open window. You need to insert foam panels and IF possible tape a sheet of Visqueen all around in the winter to prevent infiltration. If that's not possible a roll up awning temporarily attached with furring strips or magnets will help.

As to the wood stove, I have a medium size glass door stove that with hold a fir for about 8 hrs on a full load with the stack temperature holding at 200 degrees or more. The stoves I see at Tractor Supply will probably be similar to those at Coastal Farm. I would look for a stove that has at least an 18" or greater depth so you can load the wood straight in...very important! My stove has about a 17" depth and each log must be 16" or less to load. I recently got a load of Ash delivered and all but 50 or so pieces had to be cut down to 16", a real PITA.

The type of wood you have available is also important. The BTU's per hour of the various species can be found in a chart online. The glass, actually quartz gets smoked up easily so as nice as it is to watch the flames, you have to scrape it down about every 2 days.

The stove I have has a 2 speed across the top blower which works well. I recommend that type. The gasket seal on the door is the TOP design feature to insure an airtight stove for best slow combustion. Otherwise, your fire will run away on you and burn down too fast.

I have a sliding type bar air inlet, but my previous stove had a twist dial type inlet which I found easier to precisely control. Controlling the air is the secret to good combustion., so I'd look for that feature.

Most medium size stoves will heat that small space easily. A small stove may be better suited for that space, I donno? Read the specs and see what size is appropriate.

That's all I've got for Ya....:blink:
 
  • Like
Reactions: TonyM

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
This is the wood stove we put in our basement about 3 years ago.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/US-Stove-Logwood-1-600-sq-ft-Wood-Burning-Stove-2421/202398322

We didn't buy it from Home Depot, we got it from local farm store for about $275. I did all the installation, which wasn't much as it was replacing old cast Franklin stove so the exterior triple wall chimney was in place and all I had to do was run about 6' of stove pipe to existing chimney. I did have to get a reducer as old chimney pipe is 8 inches and pipe of of stove is 6". Probably spent $20 on pipe and reducer. Just a note, we are out in the country, so no regulations/inspections to worry about. However, we did follow all recommended clearances and also have a cement board mounted to floor joists above stove.

The only assembly on it was bolting on the feet, door and front apron.

We've been very happy with it. It starts quick and burns/heats well. It is not used as a primary heat source, just something to heat up the family room in the basement when it gets really chilly. You can load it from the front through the large door, but we almost always load it from the top through the cook lids.

I would think it (or something similar) would do the job well for you. If you have an existing chimney that can be used installation would be minimal unless you need to add some concrete board to a wall/ceiling to meet codes.
 

·
puffessional Scrabbleist
Joined
·
155 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to both. Great info. I hadn't thought about using a concrete saw blade to create a "wall" for the cold. Good idea. I'm still pondering some previous flooring suggestions.

We went to HD the other day and they were out of just about everything heater-wise and the guy doing the 'splaining wasn't real quick with info...or anything.

Thanks to both
TonyM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,655 Posts
I have a 1300 sq. ft. shop with 16' high roof. I bought a kit from Tractor Supply to convert a 55 gal drum into a wood stove and it works pretty good. I can heat the building 45 degrees over what it is outside. The building is made from R-Panel and just has 2" metal building insulation on the walls and ceiling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
I just replacde the wood stove I had in my shop, (Ashley), put an ad in a local ad system, and was totally lucky to get a call from a man that had one of the same make for sale. $175, looks brand new and he said he had it for 7 years and only fired it up maybe 10 times.

Try to post a wanted ad and see what happens.
 

·
puffessional Scrabbleist
Joined
·
155 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Oregon

Oregon is pretty strict as far as allowing old stoves to be re-installed somewhere else. Basically, you can't buy or sell a used woodstove in Oregon. If so we'd put the Lopi out there and replace the one in here with something new (I like Ashley) but they come down hard on this. I can't say I pay much attention to anything other than the shop so the laws could have changed while I got old but I doubt it. There are other reasons we have to tow the line here.

Our insurance is very weird because of running several businesses and, even tho activities are tapering off they still are valid. Add to this the fact we are converting our home and offices to provide wheelchair access and the bathrooms all converted to handicapped stuff and we suddenly are in in a spot where they can dictate terms. To get the`shop under our "umbrella" they get persnickety.

After my last post the insurance folks nixed the Home Depot stove due to it's lack of double-wall construction. I'm going back on to see if there is an upgrade. That's exactly what I need.
TonyM
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top