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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody see the tip that WOODSMITH Mag had for squaring a table saw sled fence?
Whaddya think?
 

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I saw that. I've been meaning to make a sled for a long time, so I'll try that. It seems like it should get you there as long as you have a good square. Probably more accurate than trying to square to the non-moving blade, since the cut already reflects the plane of the "cut line"
 

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I'm sure you already thought of this but I will add it anyway.
Before making any jigs or anything for that matter:
Make sure your table top is square to the blade.
Make sure the blade is parallel to the table slots for the runners
Make sure the fence is parallel to the blade
When I was new to woodworking, I would be just a tad sloppy in my jig making, just to see if the jig will work. They rarely ever performed well.
Then like a revelation, the light bulb went on. Everything had to be absolutely perfect. Seems obvious now, but it didn't back then because after all. it was only a test. Anyway, treat jig making as if it were a piece of fine furniture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Anyway for a non-subscriber to learn the trick that doesn't violate the forum's copyright rules?
I received it via an email from WOODSMITH and saved the article as a PDF. Can I send either to you?
But, the process is simple.
1. Attach a piece of plywood to the sled with double faced tape. The wood should span the blade kerf in ths sled.
2. Cut through the plywood.
3. Remove the cut-off.
4. Put one edge of a combination or framing square against the edge of the plywood that you just cut.
5. Adjust the sled fence so that is against the perpendicular edge of the combination square and lock it in place.
6. Sled fence and saw cut are now perpendicular.
 

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The trick with "use a square to make it perpendicular" tasks is making sure that nothing moves while you are screwing, gluing, clamping, or whatever. It isn't always easy, and it doesn't always turn out for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The trick with "use a square to make it perpendicular" tasks is making sure that nothing moves while you are screwing, gluing, clamping, or whatever. It isn't always easy, and it doesn't always turn out for me.
Doesn't always work for me either. But, this method seems so much easier than the 5-cut squaring process.
It seems so simple that I keep asking myself 'am I missing something?'
 

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The thing that comes to mind is that each sled would have to be assigned a certain blade, to account for specific tooth size, runout, etc..but you probably have the same issue with any sled/jig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The thing that comes to mind is that each sled would have to be assigned a certain blade, to account for specific tooth size, runout, etc..but you probably have the same issue with any sled/jig.
Basically the squaring process is squaring the arbor so that any blade you use should be square as long as it is flat and undamaged. This process will make the sled fence perpendicular to the arbor and any blade will also be perpendicular as long as it is flat.
 

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Agree with the perpendicular part. I wasn't clear that I was thinking of the reference edge of the cut line.
 

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mike44
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Anybody see the tip that WOODSMITH Mag had for squaring a table saw sled fence?
Whaddya think?
I have another method that I will mention here.
After attaching the runner to the sled . find the center of the sled where the fence will be. Drill a pilot hole for a screw and countersink the hole slightly on the top and bottom of the sled. The countersink on the top leaves a space for dust to accumalate when the screw enters the hole.
Drill a pilot hole for a screw in the bottom of the fence in the middle. Screw the fence to the sled with just the 1 screw for now.
Set the sled in the miter slot , Push the sled up to the edge of the table. Clamp a straight piece of scrap to the fence leaving the scrap piece over hanging the table edge. Push the sled up to the table edge, the scrap will keep the fence dead square. I would put a small amount of glue on the edges of the fence. Hot glue , wonder glue etc work fast.
Once the fence is temporairly fixed to the sled , turn the sled upside down and add screws to the bottom . Make sure you clamp the fence before you screw so it does not move.
I have never seen a cast iron or any saw table or any machine with miter slots deviate from a dead 90°.
This is a sure and fast method to square a fence to a sled.
Also, if you want to square a miter gauge the same principle applies.
Loosen the lock knob slightly, turn the gauge upside down. Slide the guage up to the tables edge, push the head tight to the edge and tighten the knob. If your saw fence rails are in the way , try it at the back of the table.
I can't do this myself because the rails are in the way and the outfeed table is also in the way to use this method. My bandsaw has simialr slots, so I square the gauge on that table.
mike
 

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The trick with "use a square to make it perpendicular" tasks is making sure that nothing moves while you are screwing, gluing, clamping, or whatever. It isn't always easy, and it doesn't always turn out for me.
The easiest way to make an attachment without anything moving is hold it in place and use an air nailer. If you dont already own a compressor, an air nailer doesn't use much air. Even the small pancake type compressors will drive an air nailer. The air hogs that need bigger compressors are sprayers and sanders.
 
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