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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at these "Woodriver" planes and wondering why the #7 jointer is actually more expensive than the Veritas #7 jointer. Woodriver is made in China which typically means lower price and in some cases questionable quality control. However, I've read some good reviews on Woodcraft, and "made in China" does not necessarily mean poor quality. But still, I have come to expect a lower price tag for imported tools. Does anyone own Woodcraft planes? What do you think of them? Should I just assume that I will get a higher quality tool from Veritas? What do you think?

The price is lower on some of the other Woodcraft planes but not a huge difference from Veritas. Since most consumers tend to associate a higher price tag with higher quality, could woodriver's pricing be a marketing ploy? Just a thought. I'd love to hear from people who own them.
 

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These days I restore vintage Stanley hand planes if I can get one at a decent price. I have a #7 in the restoration queue at the moment.

If I purchase new, I go for Veritas. I love Lie-Nielsen, but too expensive.

I have briefly looked at the Woodriver planes. Some folks on the forum have purchased. Quality seems ok, but not on a par with Veritas.

The Woodriver #7 is a conventional bevel down design. The Veritas #7 is a bevel up design.

A bevel up plane has fewer parts, e.g., no frog, no cap iron. Typically thicker blade.

Another benefit of the bevel up design is that you can purchase a blade with a different bevel angle which can help with certain woods. Higher cutting angle for end grain, wild grain, etc.

I think a restored vintage Stanley #7 can be as good as the Woodriver.

If I had to choose between a new Woodriver #7 and the Veritas #7, I would get the Veritas with the PM-V11 blade.
 

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I have some Veritas planes including the BU Jointer. I also have 3 WR's (usVed to have a 4th but sold it). Mine are V2 WR's and they've been allegedly improved ever since. The V2's are good planes. I wouldn't pay what they are asking for their #7 personally. I wouldn't, however, be worried about their quality control. If you got a dunce you'd be able to return it for a replacement. Woodcraft has been good about backing up their WR plane line. Lee Valley Veritas customer service is unparalleled in my opinion. The blade of the BU Jointer is 2 1/4" vs. 2 3/8 ( think) on the #7 if that matters to you.
 

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The new V3 Woodriver planes are decent planes. I have the #4 and #6 and they work great but did require a small amount of tuning before use. My Lie-Nielsen planes #3 and #5 were good to go right out of the box (didn't even need to be sharpened although a nice micro-bevel made them cut even better).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Woodriver #7 is a conventional bevel down design. The Veritas #7 is a bevel up design.

A bevel up plane has fewer parts, e.g., no frog, no cap iron. Typically thicker blade.
Good point... probably explains the pricing difference. I don't want to take a chance on quality so I will stick with Veritas. LN are too expensive for my budget.
 

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I have both Lie and WoodRiver. I like them both. Lie are good right out of the box and have less back lash on the adjustments. But you pay a price for that precision.

WoodRiver are about half the price of a Lie. The planes are flat, with soles under 0.001 of an inch. They aren't as pretty, there is a little more travel in the adjustments but with minimal tuning they cut just as well.
 

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People have already weighed in on the actual quality of the specific planes, so I'll stay away from that. As far as the location goes, the difference between something good made in China and something good made in Sweden or Italy or the US or wherever is the location. People seem to treat 'made in China' as a badge of shame, but the reality of it is a Chinese company is just as capable of making high end equipment or tools or whatever as an american company (or wherever), and writing off a product based only on the location of manufacturing isn't always the best plan. The Chinese made woodcraft planes are a good example, by your own admission they get good reviews and are known for being good quality.

It really comes down to what people are willing to pay. Producing something gets cheaper when you cut out the 'unnecessary' parts like quality control, highly trained workers and good materials, and Chinese companies seem to excel at that. Other Chinese companies, however, make things like iPhones. Rolling with that, Foxconn, the company that makes the components for pretty much everything Apple, also makes parts for dell computers. Says a lot about how a change in what people are willing to pay makes for a change in the quality of the finished product, even when made by the same company
 

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Lie Nielsen supports American workers and their families, made in China products support Chinese workers and their families. Buying American supports our country and our neighbors so they can buy stuff from you. Chinese workers aren't going to buy from you and your neighbors. Buying the cheapest products you can creates a race to the bottom. If you can afford it, you should buy American whenever you can.


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