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That would be a pretty good trick for a novice woodworker to dowel a joint like that with the angles it has.
A beginner yes, but supposedly he is making this design for a manufacturing company to make. If they cannot do this job accurately it is time they closed their doors.

George
 

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A beginner yes, but supposedly he is making this design for a manufacturing company to make. If they cannot do this job accurately it is time they closed their doors.

George
You're probably right but something like that is something that needs to be made cheaper than dirt. I think the cost of doweling the joint would eat their lunch.
 

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Here are a few of my thoughts about the problem:

* The triangles must be as strong as shelves. Duh. That includes the triangle with the point down, where the weight of objects will try to wedge the joint apart.

* I assume that the triangles are to be assembled by the end user, who has only the most basic skills.

* It is reasonable to assume that the package will be small; the size of the three sticks, bundled together.

* I assume that the end user has minimal tools and skills. It is reasonable to assume that the end user has a hammer, screwdrivers, and pliers. It is NOT reasonable to assume that the user has glue, dowels, chisels, or other woodworking-specific tools or knows how to use them.

* The product should be easy to assemble correctly. The product should be difficult to assemble incorrectly.

* The product must be easy to manufacture with high quality and high production yields, at a low cost to produce.

That's as far as my thinking takes me. Here are two possible solutions that meet the above requirements:

1. Use nails:
* Pre-drill the ends of the segments.
* The end user pushes the nail into the hole far enough that it engages and aligns the other piece. Enough of the nail should be engaged so that the user cannot easily bend it on the next step.
* The end user hammers the nail home.
Comments/Issues:
* The design must make it easy to align the sticks and hammer the nail. Perhaps a small jig that holds the pieces so that the nail is vertical for striking?
* Nail heads are not pretty to look at in the finished piece.

2. Use screws:
* Pre-drill the ends of the segments. Countersink one side to hide the screw head.
* The end user inserts a screw into the large hole, with the tip engaged in the other piece.
* The end user tightens the screw with a screwdriver (or you could use Allen screws and provide a cheap Allen wrench).
* The end user takes their thumb and presses a decorative plug flush in the screw hole. The decorative plug could match the wood, or it could be a contrasting color to look more like a dowel. The plug should be tight enough to be held in place through friction.
Comments/Issues:
* More expensive to design and produce.
* Quality control will be more challenging.
* Much easier for the end user.
* Looks better than solution #1, above.

Does this make any sense?
 
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