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Village Idiot
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Discussion Starter #1
So, in my never ending quest to expand my hand plane collection im thinking i need a jointer plane. Going through my head are 2 options, i can try to find an old one for cheap and refurbish it, or i can build a wooden one. Naturally, the challenge of the second appeals to me. Anybody got any resources for plans or materials theyd care to share with an idiot woodworker?
 

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There are several videos out there..here is one link to a series of 6 I believe

But looking for a better video, came across this one on how they make the iron plane...very interesting..

Hope you do a story line on how you make your wooden plane..:thumbsup:
 

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I am a big fan of James Krenov.The man builds some very nice furniture and cabinetry using not much more than a bandsaw and self made hand tools.He has a certain style that he uses for wooden planes.I have made several.I had a few books of his which are gone now but you may try googling James Krenov wooden planes.The ones I made were not difficult and worked well for me.
 

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Village Idiot
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Discussion Starter #6
Spent the last few days doing some research, and I've come up with jack in terms of actual plans, though I gave found a bunch of people making various one. So, in the great tradition of my idiocy, I decided to draw up my own dang plans. My plans as it stands are to take the model I drew up and dive in feet first. My thinking is walnut for the main body, maybe hickory for the bun, tote and possibly wedge. I'm also thinking of doing the base of the plane with a 1/8 inch thick plate of brass to cut down on wear and because, cmon, that'd look awesome. Any thoughts?
 

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Never made one so I can't help you with your plan, nor can I see it as I have an older version of Sketchup. How about exporting the plan to a *.jpg, then more of us can see/comment on it.

I don't know about the brass - can you get a hardened brass or a different alloy than the "standard" soft brass. I think the brass could scratch/gouge real easily. Don't really know, as I've never tried it, just a thought. Might also get expensive (it's all relative) for a piece of brass that large.

I also don't know anything about different alloys or "hardened" brass, just remember an article I read where someone used "hardened" brass for parts of a try square.
 

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Village Idiot
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Discussion Starter #8
Theres the JPG. I was thinking brass because of its wear resistance. Admittedly it is soft as far as metal goes, but still harder than wood so im not too worried about gouges in it. I was just thinking brass because ive seen several spokeshave plans that use a brass plate on the sole for wear resistance. Although, looking at prices now i may ditch the brass, that craps expensive
 

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Plans/instructions from the first page of Google, search string "make a wooden hand plane":

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/shopmadetools/buildingajackplane.html <-- Step by step instructions on building a jack plane, with photos of every step.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/woodworking/1273456 <-- And old article from PopMech on building three different planes, smoother, jack, and jointer.

http://www.hocktools.com/products.htm <-- Not plans, but hock sells kits. You can find them on this page.

Google also suggested the string "make your own wood plane". Here's what that got me.

http://shakerovalbox.com/finished/ToolBook.pdf <-- A free sample of a book on tool making: it includes plans for a couple of planes. You can buy the whole book through the storefront by just going to shakerovalbox.com.

https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/plans-projects/making-wooden-smoothing-plane <-- another article about making a wooden plane

http://www.scottmeekwoodworks.com/online-classes#.U4iu2ZRdXrU <-- finally, a place that offers online courses in tool making.



There's a lot of good information out there, once you figure out the right search string.
 

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Village Idiot
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Discussion Starter #11
I came across most of those articles actually. The popular mechanics one was the best that I've found but even then there's no a lot for my situation, building a jointer, and I like talking to real people every so often for their input. Thanks for the links though
 

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Here's a link I don't think I saw listed above: http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=800

Other comments: I think your front escarpment is much too large and at too low an angle. The large opening you have in your drawing will put a lot of stress on the thin side pieces. Close up the front with a steep angle of maybe 15-20 degrees and you'll get a lot more strength (and less flex potential).

Front knob is probably not necessary, but that is a personal choice. Lots of plane area to grip/hold with or without a knob.

I'd also move the rear tote as close to the blade as possible and still comfortable to grip. That's were all the force is coming from and the closer to the blade it is, the more efficient energy transfer from hand to blade. Tote design is also a personal choice, some I've seen are similar to metal planes, others have a "D" shaped handle more like a saw handle. Just make sure it is beefy enough for the work it will do. One final comment - since it is all wood, I'd mound the tote in a mortise in the plane body.

Have you decided on length/width of your plane?

As I said before, no experience building one, just observations comparing your drawing to wooden planes I've seen.
 

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Thanks for the mention! I really enjoy offering online plane making class. It works great and is the next best thing to teaching plane making live and in person. I think the best part is that it is low stress because you aren't trying to beat a time limit. There is a week in between classes to complete the homework for the next session.

FWIW, I actually just announced an advanced plane making class today which includes a jointer, like the ones that I make and sell.
I will be setting the new fall schedule with my Smoother classes and the Advanced class sometime in the next month or so.


Plans/instructions from the first page of Google, search string "make a wooden hand plane":

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/shopmadetools/buildingajackplane.html <-- Step by step instructions on building a jack plane, with photos of every step.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/woodworking/1273456 <-- And old article from PopMech on building three different planes, smoother, jack, and jointer.

http://www.hocktools.com/products.htm <-- Not plans, but hock sells kits. You can find them on this page.

Google also suggested the string "make your own wood plane". Here's what that got me.

http://shakerovalbox.com/finished/ToolBook.pdf <-- A free sample of a book on tool making: it includes plans for a couple of planes. You can buy the whole book through the storefront by just going to shakerovalbox.com.

https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/plans-projects/making-wooden-smoothing-plane <-- another article about making a wooden plane

http://www.scottmeekwoodworks.com/online-classes#.U4iu2ZRdXrU <-- finally, a place that offers online courses in tool making.



There's a lot of good information out there, once you figure out the right search string.
 

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Village Idiot
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Discussion Starter #14
Here's a link I don't think I saw listed above: http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=800

Other comments: I think your front escarpment is much too large and at too low an angle. The large opening you have in your drawing will put a lot of stress on the thin side pieces. Close up the front with a steep angle of maybe 15-20 degrees and you'll get a lot more strength (and less flex potential).

Front knob is probably not necessary, but that is a personal choice. Lots of plane area to grip/hold with or without a knob.

I'd also move the rear tote as close to the blade as possible and still comfortable to grip. That's were all the force is coming from and the closer to the blade it is, the more efficient energy transfer from hand to blade. Tote design is also a personal choice, some I've seen are similar to metal planes, others have a "D" shaped handle more like a saw handle. Just make sure it is beefy enough for the work it will do. One final comment - since it is all wood, I'd mound the tote in a mortise in the plane body.

Have you decided on length/width of your plane?

As I said before, no experience building one, just observations comparing your drawing to wooden planes I've seen.
This. This is what I was wanting to hear.. Addressing your point, the front opening angle was completely arbitrary, I chose it spur of the moment when I was drawing the plans. As far as the tote and bun go, the design there is nowhere close gk my intentions of what I intend to build, just a rough idea. Dimensions are probably going to be 2.5 inches wide or so by 2 feet long, maybe longer or shorter. This is one of those projects I plan of diving right into without any heed for plans, just jletting it come to me.

Thanks for all the help guys
 

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This is one of those projects I plan of diving right into without any heed for plans, just jletting it come to me.
Please don't take this the wrong way, but a plan and precision in your hand plane build is needed, otherwise you will live up to your Forum name.:smile:

Will love to see, and follow your build on this one..:thumbsup:
 

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Please don't take this the wrong way, but a plan and precision in your hand plane build is needed, otherwise you will live up to your Forum name.:smile:

Will love to see, and follow your build on this one..:thumbsup:
Well crap, I'm screwed then. Prevision never really was my strong suit anyway. Ah well, I'll either make a tool or modern art
 

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Well crap, I'm screwed then. Prevision never really was my strong suit anyway. Ah well, I'll either make a tool or modern art
in that case I'd suggest you make a few quick prototype planes first. do it quick and dirty, don't worry at all about how it looks, just find out what is involved in making a plane that works.
 
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