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Meant to make three outside chairs made of course out of wood, I am debating on what wood to choose from want to keep cost down, making adirondack chairs!! Could I just use regular pine wood and then stain or paint it? Or should I just got to pt wood but then I would have to wait to paint it and let it dry out, help??? Painting the regular pine would seal it, but how long??? I live in florida!!!!
 

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You could start with a species that weathers well, like White Oak, Cedar, Cypress, Redwood, Ipe. If you use pine, paint would be the best protector. If you want to see the woodgrain, you could use an oil finish, like clear Penofin Red Label.

With any film finish, including paint, it will fail, and when it does, will require quite a bit of maintennce, like sanding, which IMO is a PITA. Using a penetrating oil only requires a cleaning and re-oiling...much simpler.





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Gotcha, what about just pt pine?? Then how long do I need to wait to paint it??
I'll tell ya what. I've had bad luck painting PT. I used it for window bucks and sills. It seems that water based primer and paint needs some maintenance after six months (western exposure in Florida). I should try a sample with oil base primer and paint to make the comparison.

The sills went unpainted for several months, and were covered by awnings. We do have very wide swings in humidity on a daily basis. They seemed plenty dry. Could be a chemical reaction with the PT and the paint.






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I just made a set of Adirondack chairs this summer. First one was white oak, the other three are cypress. I sealed both with a natural oil based stain.

The chairs are only a few months old, but here are my impressions so far:

White oak - looks nicer new, but doesn't weather as well. The oil doesn't penetrate as well and the instructions on the oil say it will need to be recoated two to three times more often than it would need on softwood. If you left them natural it wouldn't be an issue. Even with the stain the color is changing fairly quickly. Also, after the first rain the grain raised quite a bit and I had to resand it, but it has been ok since. Cost would be fairly high if you were buying the lumber - I used it since I had some and couldn't originally find a source for cypress.

Cypress - I found a local source and it was actually fairly cheap - about $40 per chair. They look pretty nice, but the color of the boards seem to vary a lot more than the oak I worked with - from very light brown to almost red. It wasn't as nice to work with though in my opinion - more knots and defects to work around - but might just be the stock I was working with. The chairs are very light which would be a big plus if you plan to move them often. They stain much better than the oak - after a few months they look almost like they day I stained them while the oak already is showing some age. You can also leave the cypress unfinished if you like the silvery grey look. The grain also didn't raise like the oak. I did have one chair get very bad splits in both arms, but again may have just been bad stock. If I build more they will probably be cypress.

Here are pics of them for comparison:
 

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bostonwindows said:
What about just using regular pine wood cheap and paint it??
I would try to find a local supplier for cypress. I'm in PA and I believe the local lumber yard gets their cypress from Georgia so I'd think it should be at least as cheap in Florida. The price I paid for it was less than clear pine and only slightly more than construction grade lumber. I did a bit of research on the subject before building mine and it sounds like cypress would hold up much better in the long run as well. If you didn't want natural color chairs I think you'd have to use a solid body stain instead of paint though since the cypress is pretty oily and I'm not sure how paint would adhere.
 

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Its paintable but less is more. Maybe lightly stain with a few coats and the clear coat it. I used clear varnish and made a table with the cross section. I live in tx so uts always humid here in houston. Still standing 6yrs later
 
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