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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see ads for some hefty shelf brackets/standards to store wood. http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM=818-256

I also see plans to make rolling wood carts. http://www.woodworkingformeremortals.com/2013/01/make-rolling-lumber-cart.html.

What are you doing and why? Photos would be nice. I didn't want to spend a lot of money on this but may have to to get it done right.

Thanks!

Chuck Barnett (Now with a jointer, planer and tablesaw that I'm relatively happy with and on my way to becoming a working woodworker in fact!)
 

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I built my wood rack out of 3 2x4's an half a sheet of 1/2 inch plywood (sourced from an old shelving unit). It's had between 50 and 300 board feet of oak and maple on it continuously for two years with no problems. Save your money and build your own. Ill get pictures tomorrow.
 

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I'm just about to start a lumber rack. I've come across a few good CL deals and have too much wood sitting on the benches. I'm going to make a free standing unit with 2x4 and plywood. THe wood whisperer has a video on a wall mounted unit. I think mine is going to be similar rack, but free standing and without the sheet good cart. I might take some pictures of the build process. I think I approaching the 100th 2x4 purchase of the year soon.
 

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I have two main lumber storage areas, one on each side of the shop, aka garage.

On the one side is a stationary rack. Inexpensive. 2x4 bolted to the wall. Ripped 2x4 in half for the horizontal supports. Notched the front 2x4 to hold the horizontal supports. Top and middle sections covered in plywood for rigidity. Others are open.

I extended the horizontal supports to give capacity to store some board in front of the vertical supports.

Shop_lumber_rack_stationary_1664.jpg

I later built a mobile storage rack for boards, sheet goods and cut-offs. Based on a Shop Smith design, as I believe Steve Ramsey also used as his basis.

I am short of space, so this rack had to fit under some other high shelves and between my air compressor and other bench. It also had to allow me to park the tractor and bucket.

I modified the Shop Smith design. The front portion for cut-off's had 3 sections. I decided to eliminate the sections to avoid hassles of a piece being too wide for a section. For me this was a good idea.

I also modified the back to allow full sheets of plywood. I do not use these often, so relegated to the back.

Other modifications were plywood on the top so I could put extra stuff on the top and an upside down "L" so I have something to use to pull or push the rack, it also added rigidity to the structure.

This picture of the rack stored against garage wall.

Lumber_rack_stored.jpg

This picture of the rack pulled out for access to the board and sheet goods.

Lumber_rack_out.jpg
 

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Mine is up out of the way

About 120 cubic feet.
x
x
x
DSCN0349.jpg
 
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My wood storage is on a wall, I put black iron pipe into the wall studs at an angle.

I can't seem to get the pic attached. Anyway, the pipe is at an angle of approx. 5º, and the pipe is 1/2", and spaced 2 feet apart. . It will hold quite a load.
 

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I have a Portamate lumber rack - you can usually pick them up for $35 or so on sale at woodcraft. There isn't much on mine in the pic, but I currently have it fully loaded up with oak and walnut and it seems plenty sturdy. It can be a pain to sort through though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My wood storage is on a wall, I put black iron pipe into the wall studs at an angle...
I would be interested in seeing a pic when you can get it attached. My experience has been that if the file is too large, you don't get a lot of of clues but is simply won't ship.
I wonder 2 things: Might the pressure of the wood resting on half inch black pipe leave any markings, and does drilling into the studs far enough to insert the pipe weaken the studs?
 

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yank said:
My wood storage is on a wall, I put black iron pipe into the wall studs at an angle. I can't seem to get the pic attached. Anyway, the pipe is at an angle of approx. 5º, and the pipe is 1/2", and spaced 2 feet apart. . It will hold quite a load.
+1 with yank. I did the same thing as he explained. Plus I built one off the ceiling joists in the garage for extra. But I'm running out of room. I used galvanized pipe. image-3381215690.jpg image-3689584107.jpg image-1364684374.jpg image-2969656079.jpg
 

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I used to store all of mine up out of the way like durdyolman...
Storage.jpg

And I just installed a Portamate in my new garage.
Lumber Rack.jpg


I will say that having all of the lumber up out of the way above the garage door was much better in my smaller shop, but a pain to get things down.

The lumber rack makes it easier to pull boards from, but you sacrifice some wall space, and you don't have as good of a view of your materials.

If I had to choose (and couldn't choose both) I would go with the lumber rack. I got mine on sale at Woodcraft and accidentally ordered two. I was going to return the second one, but seeing as how quickly this one is filling up, I'm probably going to keep it and mount it either below the current one, or on a different wall.
 

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Chuck; and Dominick, I used black iron for its strength and I covered the pipe with cellophane tape to stop any black marks on the wood.
Copy and paste, link in new window.

C:\Users\Owner\Pictures\2012-02-12\S7000003.JPG
 
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