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Discussion Starter #1
I apologize in advance for my lack of brevity. Just because you clicked on this link doesn't mean you have to read it all. Just skip the first paragraph if you want and head straight to the end.

I recently got my tax return in (about $4000 more than I expected:thumbsup: ), so I decided that I needed some wood. I went to a hardwood place over in Houston and planned on getting 200 or so bf so I'd have enough to work with. I told them what I was looking for, and they said if I got random widths (i.e. let them pick the boards out) I'd get a discount. I love discounts so I agreed. I pulled the truck and trailer around to the warehouse in the back instead of the "showroom" up front and proceeded to get the lumber I wanted straight off the palates. That's where my troubles began. The 100 bf of hard maple I wanted turned into 150. That's ok, I got a nice tax return and now I can make my whole workbench out of maple instead of just the top. After getting the maple, the guy who was helping me got on the forklift and went to get the walnut. (This is the point where I'm reminded of the phrase, "The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry." My 200 bf plan was already shot by 50 bf, and it only got worse.) I had a few minutes so I looked around at the huge selection of hardwoods they had back there. All around me is a warehouse full of cedar, hickory, mahogany, cherry, zebrawood, and things I didn't even know existed. I was in heaven just looking around. Everything from 3/4 up to 12/4. Palates stacked 40 feet high and I can't even estimate the square footage it took up.

Fast forward three hours when I made it back home. I now have about 650 bf of lumber to work with. I have no place to store it. That's ok, I have room in my garage and was planning on building a rack anyway. Now it's just going to be a little bigger than I planned on. (Again, something about mice runs through my mind.) I can use the 2x6s I got for the frame of the workbench to build the rack instead, so I'm still ok. One problem. The concrete slab of my garage tends to sweat overnight sometimes, so I'm going to have to use treated lumber on the bottom of the rack. My question for you is simple. Do I have to put a non-treated runner over everything treated before I stack the hardwoods on it, or can I stack straight on the treated 2 by's and not worry about leaching some of the alcohol into the hardwoods?
 

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I don't have an answer for your treated lumber question(though I suspect that if you use modern treated lumber, you should be fine), but I do have a piece of advice based on a fairly recent experience: big. BIGBIGBIG. Built your rack as big as you can. Take all the lumber you have now, and double it, because that is what having a lumber rack does to a man. I built mine when I was at what I thought was critical mass, and within a week, I was building racks in the bedroom(my lady is VERY understanding), living room, and office. As soon as the first rack was up, wood came pouring through my door. Exotics, domestics, veneers, cast-offs, pallets, salvage, logs, burls, etc., etc., etc.. Now don't get me wrong; I'm not complaining. Just a warning: lumber racks are wood magnets, just like a well organized shop attracts irresistible tool deals, so build accordingly. Oh, and congrats on the lumber haul. Sounds like a heck of a deal.

WCT
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It wasn't as good of a deal as I'd like, but I had the trailer with me, the wood was there, I had the cash... You know how that goes. I'm pretty impulsive. If I see it and I want it, I'm getting it. Still not sure how I managed to get out of there before adding some mahogany to the list. I'm glad I did since the lumber I left with took me long enough to unload.
 

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Sawdust Wrangler
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I apologize in advance for my lack of brevity. Just because you clicked on this link doesn't mean you have to read it all. Just skip the first paragraph if you want and head straight to the end.

I recently got my tax return in (about $4000 more than I expected:thumbsup: ), so I decided that I needed some wood. I went to a hardwood place over in Houston and planned on getting 200 or so bf so I'd have enough to work with. I told them what I was looking for, and they said if I got random widths (i.e. let them pick the boards out) I'd get a discount. I love discounts so I agreed. I pulled the truck and trailer around to the warehouse in the back instead of the "showroom" up front and proceeded to get the lumber I wanted straight off the palates. That's where my troubles began. The 100 bf of hard maple I wanted turned into 150. That's ok, I got a nice tax return and now I can make my whole workbench out of maple instead of just the top. After getting the maple, the guy who was helping me got on the forklift and went to get the walnut. (This is the point where I'm reminded of the phrase, "The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry." My 200 bf plan was already shot by 50 bf, and it only got worse.) I had a few minutes so I looked around at the huge selection of hardwoods they had back there. All around me is a warehouse full of cedar, hickory, mahogany, cherry, zebrawood, and things I didn't even know existed. I was in heaven just looking around. Everything from 3/4 up to 12/4. Palates stacked 40 feet high and I can't even estimate the square footage it took up.

Fast forward three hours when I made it back home. I now have about 650 bf of lumber to work with. I have no place to store it. That's ok, I have room in my garage and was planning on building a rack anyway. Now it's just going to be a little bigger than I planned on. (Again, something about mice runs through my mind.) I can use the 2x6s I got for the frame of the workbench to build the rack instead, so I'm still ok. One problem. The concrete slab of my garage tends to sweat overnight sometimes, so I'm going to have to use treated lumber on the bottom of the rack. My question for you is simple. Do I have to put a non-treated runner over everything treated before I stack the hardwoods on it, or can I stack straight on the treated 2 by's and not worry about leaching some of the alcohol into the hardwoods?
here is what I built in my shop.

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/racking-my-brain/?category_name=the-shop%2Cmisc

I placed a plastic sheet on the concrete floor and bought 1 6" wide composite deck board, from Lowes, and cut it into 24" pieces for the very bottom rack (they lay on the plastic.) I did not make my cutoffs rack part of this rack (like Marc shows.) If you look in my photos, there is a sketchup model of mine SU workshop 04 that shows exactly how mine is. It' works great. That said, most of the "wood collectors" that I know go vertical if the wood lengths don't exceed ceiling heights. I want a vertical rack, and still will have one, but much of my wood it taller than my 10' wall.
Similar to this
http://www.woodtalkonline.com/topic/3851-vertical-lumber-storage-rack/

Ooops, I forgot to show the rolling rack that I plan to build. Mine will have the chop saw builtin to it

http://www.woodworkingformeremortals.com/2013/01/make-rolling-lumber-cart.html

I hope this helps

Paul
 

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Old School
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I would suggest until you get your rack built, to sticker the lumber. I wouldn't use treated pieces, but any stock, even plywood will work. Cut strips from ¾" about an inch wide and lay first strips on the floor, about every 18"-24". Lay your board. and lay the second row of stickers...and so on. This allows airflow around the wood.







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Discussion Starter #6
I'd love to go with a vertical rack. Unfortunately, my ceilings are only 8' tall so I'd be limited to 8' or smaller stock. Right now I have some 12' stock so that kills that idea.

I thought you only had to sticker lumber if it was still drying. It wasn't stickered in the warehouse I got it from. Would that lead to problems down the road?
 

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Old School
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I'd love to go with a vertical rack. Unfortunately, my ceilings are only 8' tall so I'd be limited to 8' or smaller stock. Right now I have some 12' stock so that kills that idea.

I thought you only had to sticker lumber if it was still drying. It wasn't stickered in the warehouse I got it from. Would that lead to problems down the road?
It could, and most likely would if the wood continues to be stacked board on board.



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I thought you only had to sticker lumber if it was still drying. It wasn't stickered in the warehouse I got it from. Would that lead to problems down the road?
Yes, only lumber that is drying should be stickered - dry lumber should be "dead stacked", just stacked board on board.

Stickering allows airflow, which you want if the wood is still drying. Once it is dry, though, and especially if it is kiln dried, having airflow will cause the moisture content of the wood to increase, as it will draw moisture from the surrounding air.

You mentioned the concrete floor "sweating", so in your case it is particularly important to keep the wood off the concrete floor and to not provide air space for the wood to absorb that moisture (e.g. don't sticker).

Regarding the PT wood question, I probably would put a layer of non-PT wood between the PT and the lumber, since the chemicals in the PT lumber can discolor some hardwoods. As a practical matter, though, you should be find either way.
 

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Old School
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Yes, only lumber that is drying should be stickered - dry lumber should be "dead stacked", just stacked board on board.

Stickering allows airflow, which you want if the wood is still drying. Once it is dry, though, and especially if it is kiln dried, having airflow will cause the moisture content of the wood to increase, as it will draw moisture from the surrounding air.




We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions. In doing that your location will show when you post. You posted six times in 31 minutes, and must have missed the introduction section.

Wood never dries completely. Even kiln dried wood. Storing kiln dried wood in a controlled environment where the temperature and humidity doesn't change would allow for wood to be stored and not stickered. Any other environment, stacking board on board still leaves the edges exposed to changes in ambient temperature and humidity.















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