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I'm going to attempt my first project, and I'm planning to make a radiator cover with mission-style sides. Since this is my first project and I don't have access to more than basic woodworking tools I was considering using wood pegs and just drilling a hole on each spindle (is that what they're called?) and on the top piece of wood, and then gluing them together with a wood peg. Has anyone tried this, or know if it would work and still be a strong joint?

Thanks!
 

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I really think that a motise and tenon would be easier. Just drill holes in the top and chisel them square. Hand saw the "spindles" to fit.
 

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im a beginner like you KIT and ill say this .........sometimes i take the easy way out and my skill set shows it...now i do things the hard way and im learning so much more
 

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What you are describing is, technically, also called a mortise and tenon, just that it's called a "loose" or "floating" tenon (and "round" in your case). Whether or not such as joint is strong enough is entirely a matter of the overall construction that it goes in and what kind of forces it will encounter.

If you use a fairly large-diameter pin, so that it has plenty of surface area for the glue, and provided that it's not subjected to a large force pulling directly parallel to the pin, then it should work just fine. Also, the depth of seating of the loose tenon in both sides will have an effect since a shallow hole won't provide much glue area (and could even be insufficient to resist torquing stresses if there are any).
 

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What you are describing is, technically, also called a mortise and tenon, just that it's called a "loose" or "floating" tenon (and "round" in your case). Whether or not such as joint is strong enough is entirely a matter of the overall construction that it goes in and what kind of forces it will encounter.

If you use a fairly large-diameter pin, so that it has plenty of surface area for the glue, and provided that it's not subjected to a large force pulling directly parallel to the pin, then it should work just fine. Also, the depth of seating of the loose tenon in both sides will have an effect since a shallow hole won't provide much glue area (and could even be insufficient to resist torquing stresses if there are any).
That pretty much covers it.










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