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did you use the chip board as the backer ? (or something else).

I think it works the same as wooden table tops also.
in the "sign makers world", it took us a lot of time (and $$.$$) to finally figure out that that ALL sides of a painted project needed (required) equal amounts of coatings to maintain equilibrium and remain flat after installation.
so the glue may be working the same as paint or primer in "sealing" only one side of the board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
did you use the chip board as the backer ? (or something else).

I think it works the same as wooden table tops also.
in the "sign makers world", it took us a lot of time (and $$.$$) to finally figure out that that ALL sides of a painted project needed (required) equal amounts of coatings to maintain equilibrium and remain flat after installation.
so the glue may be working the same as paint or primer in "sealing" only one side of the board.
Yes, i did use the 10mm chipboard.
 

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The OP said it was a sound diffusers. The color and pattern in the design is nice to look at.
It needs a hidden, singular defect to amuse the more critical viewer.

Something elastic like hot glue would be fast, effective and sound-modulating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
The OP said it was a sound diffusers. The color and pattern in the design is nice to look at.
It needs a hidden, singular defect to amuse the more critical viewer.

Something elastic like hot glue would be fast, effective and sound-modulating.
Its doesnt really meet the standards to be defined as a "real" sound diffuser.
For that i would need to position each piece mathematically correct and with different heights etc.
But the properties of wood will diffuse the sound in some way or another. At least more than a concrete wall.
It will not absorb the sound, but rather diffuse and split the different frequencies. But its not really the maint point for me.
But i do enjoy working with wood material, colors and patterns.

When you say it needs a hidden singular defect. What exactly do you mean with that? Like some sort of artistic expression?

Would it be less warping if id use hot glue instead of wood glue you think?
 

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Thanks guys. Interesting to read the different views and solutions.

Why i chose chipboard? Its cheap and the right size without having to cut a big board with table saw.
Ive had bad experience with plywood. Last summer i bought a 12mm plywood board 2440x1220mm which i had to cut into 4 boards at the store. After a couple of days all the boards were warped or bent. Which i didnt expect hence its very expensive and most people recomend using plywood. So to avoid making the same mistake again i chose this chip board instead. I thought first it was OSB but apparently its not, since its described here as a chip board. But at least its still flat and feels very solid.

I have never used hot glue before but maybe i can try that or construction glue. Sounds like a good idea.
At the moment i dont have compressor or nail gun. So im hoping the glue option will be enough to make the pieces stick
to the board. I havent used neither before, but do both cure fast without need for clamping?
Ok, if you don't have air compressor and nailer then:
Super glue + construction glue. This is really really good the way for this.
It's my advice
 

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Ok, so i finished the project. Result as you can see - warpage. Surprise :)
I think i panicked and just wanted to get it done. I havent measured exactly,
but i guess its around 1/4 inch warpage towards both sides.

I wanted to make it "frameless" so i made the panel slightly smaller so it gets less visible.
I screwed the panel flat down with 4 screws on my bench.
Used titebond 2 premium wood glue on the back of each piece.
After guing all pieces i let it dry and waited around 48 hours before unscrewing and release the board.
At first the panel was flat, but it has slowly been warping the last week (in stable living room temp) as you can see on the images.


View attachment 431604 View attachment 431603
View attachment 431602
A number of years ago I got the idea of making a wood floor like a mosaic out of 3/8"x 3/8"x 3/4" blocks out of different kinds of wood. I cut out sheets of 1/4" plywood 20"x 20" and glued the blocks to the plywood with wood glue. The longer each finished section sat the more they warped. After making 8 or 10 of them and seeing how they cracked when I tried to force them flat again I gave up on the project. I think if I had used a resin glue and put the sections in a press until fully dry I would have had better luck. The bottom line is the substrate has to be held flat until the glue is fully dry. Wood glue just takes a lot longer to fully harden than you think away from air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Any advice on how to reverse the warping? Sealing and finish both sides is mentioned here. Im not an experienced woodworker so im not shure exactly what that means and what i should use as a finish.
Since its the backside of the frame and meant to be hung on a wall im just concerned that it could leave marks or traces on the wall if i were to paint or use other sealing/finish products on the backside :unsure:
 

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I would try drying the convex side and see if it flattens some, seal it with some type of non water base sealer. Last resort would be to cut kerfs in the back to "force" it flat.
 

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Any advice on how to reverse the warping? Sealing and finish both sides is mentioned here. Im not an experienced woodworker so im not shure exactly what that means and what i should use as a finish.
Since its the backside of the frame and meant to be hung on a wall im just concerned that it could leave marks or traces on the wall if i were to paint or use other sealing/finish products on the backside :unsure:
You might heat the underside and then clamp it to something flat, only you need to put something under the middle of it and make it bow a little in the other direction. I think probably the glue hasn't quite hardened yet and will continue to warp unless you take action now. If you let the glue completely harden some of the blocks are likely to crack if you force it flat latter.
 
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