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Most CA glue is as thin as water and isn't real great for woodworking. So much of it soaks into the wood it doesn't leave a lot for the joint. For what you are doing using CA glue I would recommend the thicker variety. It has the consistency a little thicker than wood glue. https://www.amazon.com/Professional...ocphy=9022733&hvtargid=pla-319675851483&psc=1

Not having done anything like that in 30 years it's difficult to say how much it would take. If it isn't too difficult to acquire you might get a couple bottles and see how far it goes and then get enough to finish.
 

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I would probably go with construction adhesive and a small 23 ga nail from the air gun to hold it in place while the adhesive dries. And yeah, don't use particle board backer. Plywood would be my choice, especially if the backer will be used to mount picture hanging hardware.
 

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There are electrical staple guns that aren't very expensive......if you're still considering mechanical fastening. Depending on the gun you can shhot different types and sizes of staples and brad nails.
Inexpensive option and no compressor required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I watched some youtube videos and it seems like most of them just use regular wood glue, like titebond premium, without clamping. Looked so easy, then i read all the comments here one more time and especially one of the first: "dont overthink it". I then used two different glues which i had and made a sample of each. One was a construction glue, pattex-no more nails and the other a regular cascol wood glue. Waited 24 hours and used all my muscle strength trying to remove the pieces. Which was impossible. So i guess good quality wood glue will work just fine.

When it comes to the backing its probably a mix between chipboard and osb. Its called multiplate premium (multiboard).
I know most people recomend using plywood, but as mentioned ive had bad experience with plywood. So im just curious why youd rather use plywood instead of this backing?
 

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what is your connection with Spotify and the music ?? are you one of the contributors ?

when I mentioned plywood, I was suggesting a good grade of Birch A/B grade. not the construction grade that warps and curls in your car even before you get it home. I think of "chip board" as the lowest, cheapest grade available.
but - I am in Florida - you are in Norway. big difference in the local atmospheric conditions.
I was in Bergen a few times with the US Navy. once in the winter, half a dozen in the "warmer" times. it was all beautiful !!!
 

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I watched some youtube videos and it seems like most of them just use regular wood glue, like titebond premium, without clamping. Looked so easy, then i read all the comments here one more time and especially one of the first: "dont overthink it". I then used two different glues which i had and made a sample of each. One was a construction glue, pattex-no more nails and the other a regular cascol wood glue. Waited 24 hours and used all my muscle strength trying to remove the pieces. Which was impossible. So i guess good quality wood glue will work just fine.

When it comes to the backing its probably a mix between chipboard and osb. Its called multiplate premium (multiboard).
I know most people recomend using plywood, but as mentioned ive had bad experience with plywood. So im just curious why youd rather use plywood instead of this backing?
The particle or chip board we get in the US basically crumbles to nothing after it gets moist. It also has zero structural strength, I would be worried that I could pull apiece off by hand over time, and the glue wouldn't fail, but a piece of the chipboard would just chunk off. This has happened to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Maybe i got the wrong type of plywood for my need, although i did ask specifically what it would be used for. And when i called back and said that the boards were bent, they just said "oh that was weird" like theyve never heard that could ever happen. Anyways, ill keep that in mind for the next time. Yes, its that "over time" that worries me a bit. So i should probably go for quality grade plywood next so i dont have to worry about pieces falling off. But the climate and humidity is pretty stable and average so itll probably last many years.

Im from Oslo, and only been in Bergen once, for sure its really nice city with the fjords and all, at least when its not raining:). I am part time musician and enjoy making some music. If its not appropriate as a signature or violating forum rules just let me know and ill remove it. To be honest i havent read the rules yet. My bad.
 

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The particle or chip board we get in the US basically crumbles to nothing after it gets moist. It also has zero structural strength, I would be worried that I could pull apiece off by hand over time, and the glue wouldn't fail, but a piece of the chipboard would just chunk off. This has happened to me.
#1...Actually it doesn't if finished correctly, but I don't know why anyone would use it outside? #2....it actually has some strength. It's on many US countertops..
 

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If you haven't done it yet, I would recommend you start in the middle and work outwards. By starting on one edge and working across to the opposite, any small deviation in alignment, along the way, would/may gradually increase any degree of error(s) in the alignments.

Sonny
 

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It won't be difficult to glue together. Clamping isn't necessary. The issue you may run into is as the glue dries and shrinks it will draw up warping the board you are gluing it to. If you can I would make the board you are mounting the blocks to oversized and screw it down to something that will hold it flat. Then allow the glue on the blocks to dry a couple weeks before taking the screws out. It would be better if you used hide glue or a resin glue.
I'd do what Steve suggest with a backing fixed to the back of your panel to prevent warpage .just a simple square frame behind it nailed or screwed down. Then you could use 1/4" plywood which is around $20 for a 4x8 sheet where I live and the chip board is not necessary..Something like a picture frame behind it ..For that matter something similar like a shaker cabinet door. It would hold the plywood down just fine and if done right would let the ply expand and contract with the weather..
 
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What do you mean its not a structural application?
Not the person you were originally asking, but i believe he was meaning that the glue joint wouldnt be bearing any sort of load or seeing any pressure, just holding the one piece. Compare that to something like a mortise and tenon holding a chair frame together, that would be structural since its responsible for the structure of the piece
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Ok, so i finished the project. Result as you can see - warpage. Surprise :)
I think i panicked and just wanted to get it done. I havent measured exactly,
but i guess its around 1/4 inch warpage towards both sides.

I wanted to make it "frameless" so i made the panel slightly smaller so it gets less visible.
I screwed the panel flat down with 4 screws on my bench.
Used titebond 2 premium wood glue on the back of each piece.
After guing all pieces i let it dry and waited around 48 hours before unscrewing and release the board.
At first the panel was flat, but it has slowly been warping the last week (in stable living room temp) as you can see on the images.


Textile Rectangle Wood Flooring Indoor games and sports
Road surface Rectangle Wood Asphalt Floor

Wood Beam Wood stain Shade Flooring
 

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My spouse is working on a large intarsia project. It is a map with thin pieces glued down to 1/4 inch Baltic Birch plywood. The wood species and grain direction varies for each piece. (Yeah, she has her own way of doing her projects, and sometimes does not heed my advice.)

A similar thing is happening - the backing is warped. Her project curls down at the edges. Yours is different - it curls up.

My hypothesis is that the glue on the front seals the plywood backing, but there is no corresponding glue (or finish) on the back side. As moisture is absorbed on the rear side from the air, the plywood expands slightly and there is warping. Just a guess. I wonder whether finishing the back will improve the warping on my spouse's project. In any event, it will be a wall hanging - she can live with the warping.
 
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