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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I am attempting to make a so called modern wood wall art or a sound diffuser to be hung on the wall.
Everything is prepared and the 250 pieces of wood are ready to be glued on the board.

Cloud Sky Wood Triangle Creative arts


This is a closeup of the pieces of wood (spruce) and the 10mm board:

Wood Toy block Rectangle Engineering Lego


At this point im not really sure how to proceed. So id like to hear from you guys what you think is the best way to
apply the glue properly. Thanks for any advice! :)
 

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I've never had good luck with chip board. Plywood or even mdf will work better.

I would probably use construction adhesive. It's cheap and won't require clamps.
 

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it's "art" that will hang on a wall - not a rock climbing project. TiteBond II wood glue will work just fine. but, I would reconsider the backer - like 1/4" plywood, etc.
don't over think it. (and welcome to the forum).
 

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It looks like these are end grain spruce blocks that you want to attach to chipboard. End grain gluing usually requires a heavier glue spread depending on how porous the wood is. The spruce I'm familiar with has open pores in the end grain which would absorb a lot of glue. It would take a heavy spread on the end grain and a light touch of glue on the substrate to get adhesion with low clamping pressure. BUT, chipboard is also absorbent swells a lot when it absorbs moisture. Adding lots of moisture to one face of a chipboard panel will bow it. I would steer clear of a water based glue like Titebond. Hot glue or construction adhesive sound like good ideas to me, but I've worked very little with either.
 

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Hard to clamp so many pieces and with such shapes. For interior wall art with no planned stresses on it, I'd use carpet tape. Carpet tape is GREAT for unusual applications like this! If you want true sound absorption, though, go with foam "egg crate" material. (I'm a drummer, so I am not totally uniformed about killing noise.)
 

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I think in this particular application, with end grain and all, I would also go with construction adhesive. Just a dab and press in place
 

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How about attaching through the back with a brad or pin nailer or staple? Got a small air compressor?
I said construction adhesive, but this might be even better... or do both if you want the belt and suspenders approach
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys. Interesting to read the different views and solutions.

Why i chose chipboard? Its cheap and the right size without having to cut a big board with table saw.
Ive had bad experience with plywood. Last summer i bought a 12mm plywood board 2440x1220mm which i had to cut into 4 boards at the store. After a couple of days all the boards were warped or bent. Which i didnt expect hence its very expensive and most people recomend using plywood. So to avoid making the same mistake again i chose this chip board instead. I thought first it was OSB but apparently its not, since its described here as a chip board. But at least its still flat and feels very solid.

I have never used hot glue before but maybe i can try that or construction glue. Sounds like a good idea.
At the moment i dont have compressor or nail gun. So im hoping the glue option will be enough to make the pieces stick
to the board. I havent used neither before, but do both cure fast without need for clamping?
 

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Keep in mind that most wood glues, like Titebond need to be clamped tight.
Thats not completely accurate, wood glues will actually adhere just fine without any clamping pressure at all. The clamps just hold things in place while the glue dries. As long as the 2 parts are stationary through the glue drying, the resulting joint will be just as strong, clamps or no, just gotta do a bare minimum of prep work
 

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Thats not completely accurate, wood glues will actually adhere just fine without any clamping pressure at all. The clamps just hold things in place while the glue dries. As long as the 2 parts are stationary through the glue drying, the resulting joint will be just as strong, clamps or no, just gotta do a bare minimum of prep work
... and as long as the two parts are very close together. The thicker the layer of wood glue between the two parts, the weaker the joint.
 

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Hi guys,

I am attempting to make a so called modern wood wall art or a sound diffuser to be hung on the wall.
Everything is prepared and the 250 pieces of wood are ready to be glued on the board.

View attachment 431225

This is a closeup of the pieces of wood (spruce) and the 10mm board:

View attachment 431226

At this point im not really sure how to proceed. So id like to hear from you guys what you think is the best way to
apply the glue properly. Thanks for any advice! :)
I would definitely consider a CA glue (cyranoacyrlate). Commonly known as Crazy Glue, but there are better products out there. One I us a lot is called 2P-10. You can get it as a thin, thick, or gel. For what you are doing I think thick would be fine. Without the activator you are likely looking at a 15-20 second bond time. They also make an aerosol activator which cuts bond time to around 5-10 seconds. https://www.amazon.com/FastCap-Thic...041&keywords=2p10+glue&qid=1632958523&sr=8-15
 

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... and as long as the two parts are very close together. The thicker the layer of wood glue between the two parts, the weaker the joint.
Also not completely accurate. Granted, small sample size, but it does show that a gapped glue joint is actually stronger than a clamped tight joint
 

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It won't be difficult to glue together. Clamping isn't necessary. The issue you may run into is as the glue dries and shrinks it will draw up warping the board you are gluing it to. If you can I would make the board you are mounting the blocks to oversized and screw it down to something that will hold it flat. Then allow the glue on the blocks to dry a couple weeks before taking the screws out. It would be better if you used hide glue or a resin glue.
 

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mike44
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Thanks guys. Interesting to read the different views and solutions.

Why i chose chipboard? Its cheap and the right size without having to cut a big board with table saw.
Ive had bad experience with plywood. Last summer i bought a 12mm plywood board 2440x1220mm which i had to cut into 4 boards at the store. After a couple of days all the boards were warped or bent. Which i didnt expect hence its very expensive and most people recomend using plywood. So to avoid making the same mistake again i chose this chip board instead. I thought first it was OSB but apparently its not, since its described here as a chip board. But at least its still flat and feels very solid.

I have never used hot glue before but maybe i can try that or construction glue. Sounds like a good idea.
At the moment i dont have compressor or nail gun. So im hoping the glue option will be enough to make the pieces stick
to the board. I havent used neither before, but do both cure fast without need for clamping?
If you use hot hide glue you do not need an electric glue pot. They are expensive, a cheap small crock pot will do. I bought mine from Target years ago for under $10.00. Then bought a candy thermometer . Do a search for hot hide glue and the applications. Any glue that is not used can be put in a sealed container and refrigerated or frozen.
Refrigerated probably will still be good for 2 weeks.Frozen , 8/10 months. I place extra glue in old unused ice cube trays. When the glue cools I pop them out and put them in a plastic bag. This way you only have to reheat as many cubes as needed for a particular job. If you use glue the next day , leave glue in the pot. Left in the pot for several days will let the glue get rancid. After all the glue is made from animal hide.
Often the glue is applied , let cool, parts positioned and a heat gun activates the glue and the parts clamped or weighted down. Most of the time clamps are not needed, joints are just held together for a minute or so til the glue cools.
mike
 
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