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WWhen I worked I residential cabinetry, you used a lot pf glue, but you were careful. You had to be careful not to get intonation the insides of flat, raised panel doors, face frames,etc. Where you would use a bead in cabinetry, you will load it in furniture. They want to see it pressing out the joint, not part of it, but everywhere...They also want it removed right then.
 

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@Indywar2
your atatement " ............immediately wipe the glue off with a wet rag. Then I sanded starting at 80 grit up to.........."

I dont know how long your waited before you started sanding so...........
If you started too soon, you may have moved the glued area sanding residue on to the outer edges of the joint.
Also, I dont know what condition your wood is in when you glued it up or any other of your work habits, but I never found a need for 80 grit sandpaper on a glue joint. For that matter, I rarely ever find a need for 80 grit paper except for 'sculpting' or flattening a table top with a 4x24 belt sander. Even at that, I dont think I even own any 80m grit paper. Anyway, this all gets back to the possibility of you spreading uncured glue that the 80 grit paper dug out of the joint.
 

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I have long gone away from the good squeeze out method, little glue goes a long way, if it is a real sloppy joint I use epoxy. If I get some glue that comes out I use a damp not wet rags with each wipe I move to a clean area of the rag. For inside corners I use a very thin artist palette knive covered with damp linen, once again not wiping more than once with the same area of the cloth. If in the end I missed some spot dye stain will hide it. What I don't like about TB it is runny on vertical joints like spindles on chairs when you have a number to do at one time, it always make mess. A thicker glue like Elmers Pro doesn't do that, JMHO
 

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Good evening everyone,

I have been working on an end table project for my wife.

I created the end tables using pocket screws and wood glue (Titebond 2) and immediately wipe the glue off with a wet rag. Then I sanded starting at 80 grit up to 150 grit. Prior to staining I used Miniwax pre-stain wood conditioner (for oil based stains...I assume this is a diluted Shellac but maybe it is something else) and then I used a Varathane oil based stain.

After staining there were several area that were not accepting the stain.
1) some small area on a panel where the boards were edge joined
2) The edge where a trim piece met the panel (90 degrees to each other)

I am assume this is due to glue reside not being sufficiently remove prior to staining. I can't think of any other cause and am open to ideas.

I am curious if there are recommendations how to prevent this in the future. I don't recall having this problem in the past and would like to avoid it in the future.

Thanks,
Rob

View attachment 434323
Use a scraper to clean off the area. Use less glue so there is less squeeze out too. I made a scraper out of an old plane iron. I roughly sharpen the edge on 400 grit diamond stone to create a burr on the back side. That burr works great and leaves a pretty good finish behind.
 

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if you (or anyone) will be doing a lot of gluing and staining, you may want to look into TiteBond Fluorescent Glue Although the advertisements often show the small bottle that we are accustomed to, it is not available. One and Five gallon only (smaller sizes by special order. My suggestion would be to buy a gallon and divide up between your friends.
Youtuber "Next level Carpentry" recently showed that regular TiteBond glue also fluoresces, granted not as much as the real stuff. It's worth a shot at least.
 

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Youtuber "Next level Carpentry" recently showed that regular TiteBond glue also fluoresces, granted not as much as the real stuff. It's worth a shot at least.
You can get it in a powdered form wnd add it to your existing glue...
 
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