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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good evening everyone,

I have been working on an end table project for my wife.

I created the end tables using pocket screws and wood glue (Titebond 2) and immediately wipe the glue off with a wet rag. Then I sanded starting at 80 grit up to 150 grit. Prior to staining I used Miniwax pre-stain wood conditioner (for oil based stains...I assume this is a diluted Shellac but maybe it is something else) and then I used a Varathane oil based stain.

After staining there were several area that were not accepting the stain.
1) some small area on a panel where the boards were edge joined
2) The edge where a trim piece met the panel (90 degrees to each other)

I am assume this is due to glue reside not being sufficiently remove prior to staining. I can't think of any other cause and am open to ideas.

I am curious if there are recommendations how to prevent this in the future. I don't recall having this problem in the past and would like to avoid it in the future.

Thanks,
Rob

Wood Rectangle Floor Wood stain Flooring
 

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Termite
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Did you wipe it out with more than one rag?

When building furniture..
1 rag for major wipe
1 rag for secondary wipe
1 rag for final cleaning.
 

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Good evening everyone,

I have been working on an end table project for my wife.

I created the end tables using pocket screws and wood glue (Titebond 2) and immediately wipe the glue off with a wet rag. Then I sanded starting at 80 grit up to 150 grit. Prior to staining I used Miniwax pre-stain wood conditioner (for oil based stains...I assume this is a diluted Shellac but maybe it is something else) and then I used a Varathane oil based stain.

After staining there were several area that were not accepting the stain.
1) some small area on a panel where the boards were edge joined
2) The edge where a trim piece met the panel (90 degrees to each other)

I am assume this is due to glue reside not being sufficiently remove prior to staining. I can't think of any other cause and am open to ideas.

I am curious if there are recommendations how to prevent this in the future. I don't recall having this problem in the past and would like to avoid it in the future.

Thanks,
Rob

View attachment 434323
One issue may be the Titebond II. I, and others have found, that although this is a good adhesive, it has a propensity for creep. Creep is when after a joint or edge is glued, the glue can continue to emerge from the joint. I prefer Titebond original for that reason, or Titebond Extend when more open time is needed. I reserve type II for high moisture area projects. Second, and I was guilty of this myself for years, is over gluing. I always would glue until I had squeeze out during assembly. That is not necessary. Be selective about the areas you glue, and how much is applied. For instance on a conventional mortise and tenon joint there is really no need to glue the shoulders. The tenon, or the mortise is really all the glue surface required. In areas where you think you will get squeeze out, mask off the areas you do not want glued. Finally, and often the easiest fix, is to stain before assembly and avoid the situation all together.
 

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I usually keep a bucket of water handy when I assemble something. Sometimes it isn't enough to wipe the glue off with a damp rag. Sometimes you have to really scrub it with a dripping wet rag. If you do a lot of assembly at once, from time to time wring out the rag a few times to insure the rag is free of glue.
 

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I tend to leave the glue there and knock it off with a chisel so I know I get it all. I always worry that I'm really just spreading it around when I wipe with a rag.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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I use TBII and have a small bucket of water and some small rectangular sponges to clear the glue squeeze out from the joint. Lots of wiping after clamping to make sure it's all gone. I also only do one join at a time to give me time to properly get things cleaned. Occasionally, the wood itself will suck glue into the grain and thwart your best efforts. I am always a bit stunned when I discover glue stain after the initial coloring of the wood. Out come the artists brushes and the oil based dye to "paint" in the offending white spot.
 

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Titebond liquid hide glue. Dries hard so easier to scrape and sand. Also stainable. Been using it for a few years now. Bonus is long open time, important for complicated glue ups.
 

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if you (or anyone) will be doing a lot of gluing and staining, you may want to look into TiteBond Fluorescent Glue Although the advertisements often show the small bottle that we are accustomed to, it is not available. One and Five gallon only (smaller sizes by special order. My suggestion would be to buy a gallon and divide up between your friends.
Liquid Purple Bottle Bottle cap Fluid
 

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We had this problem making chairs, the reason we cane up with the 1-2-3 rule and eliminated the problem.

You can also buy fluorescent powder and add to glue. we bought such large containers of glue we couldn’t get fluorescent already mixed in TB2.
 

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I tend to leave the glue there and knock it off with a chisel so I know I get it all. I always worry that I'm really just spreading it around when I wipe with a rag.
I do the same for the same reason. I wait into it gets a little hardened, gummy, and then chisel it off.
 

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You won’t spread it if you clean it correctly.

Why I posted #2.
 

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I tend to leave the glue there and knock it off with a chisel so I know I get it all. I always worry that I'm really just spreading it around when I wipe with a rag.
i'm with bigcountry and noek, i was taught in high school shop class to let it dry and scrape it off, wiping spreads and pushes glue into the grain. i have learned here to wipe then wipe with a wet rag, it works ok. typically on a glue up i dry and scrape, inside joint wipe and wet wipe
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone for all the great responses. It looks like I have some good options to try to prevent this in the future.

Thank you for your help and have a happy New Year.
Rob
 

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A while ago, I was making some jigs and I was short on glue, so I was trying to stretch every drop. I put really thin coats on both surfaces and clamped them up. The only squeeze-out was small beads that scraped off easily once partially dry. The joints on those jigs held up fine and I've been doing the same thing ever since. I concluded that you only need enough squeeze-out to know the joint isn't starved.
 

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mike44
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Contrary to most of the posts wiping glue is not a good idea. As some posts mentioned , wiping with a wet or dry rag gets glue into the grain. I was taught by cabinet makers to let the glue dry til it is the consistency of putty. Then remove the glue with a sharp chisel. I have a set of crank neck chisels that is perfect for cleaning the glue residue.
Usually the glue will set in about 45 minutes at 70° . Then the glue will pare right off without getting into the pores.
If you use HOT hide glue the residue is ready to come off in under 10 minutes. Also Hot hide glue takes a stain.
I have never used the bottled hide glue that Titebond sells, so I can't comment on it.
mike
 

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Most of what I've read and experienced with bottled hide glue wasn't good. I tried it once with bad results and what I've read indicates that it needs to be fresh to work well, but that because stores sell so little of it, it's unlikely to be fresh.

Not to be confused with hot hide glue which is a whole nuther thing.
 

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I quit using the wet rag 40 years ago and never looked back. Let the glue set up, then scrape it off with a hive tool. I don't like to use a chisel at this point because it will shave off bits that are stuck in the pores whereas a hive tool (or dull chisel) lifts them out. When the glue is hard, plane it or use a card scraper to remove the remainder. I had enough of washing dishes as a kid; I don't want to spend my time washing wood, only to find out later I have to sand some more to get some glue I missed. Wiping wet glue with a wet rag dilutes and distributes it and forces it into the pores on porous woods like oak. It has bad idea written all over it.
Just for fun, edge glue a couple boards together and wash them down with your wet rag. Then take them apart. You will notice that the glue near the surface is thinner than the glue near the middle; it has taken on water from your rag and been diluted. The wood has also swollen near the outside edges, further sqeezing out more of the thinned down glue, which, because it is thinner, is quite willing to squeeze out. This swelling also creates a little ridge of wood, which if planed or sanded before fully dry becomes a depression when the wood does dry.
I edge glue boards all the time with no mechanical means to hold them together -- no dowels, splines, biscuits -- nothing but glue. In 40 years of doing this I have not had a joint fail. I have seen a number of joints fail that I know were wiped down with wet rags, though, because either I or my father did them, many years ago before I knew better.
Finally, the extra water extends the drying time. That may not matter to some, but I like to get on with things. Water is for drinking, not glueing. YMMV.
 

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I have had a problem with raising the grain when using a wet rag. Then when I stain, the raised grain absorbs more stain. If you wipe it with wit rag, you should resand.
 

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To the OP, the only way I know if to fix it is either sand and restain, or tint it to match with a toner spray.

Regards to glue clean up, I guess either way will work, I prefer to wipe off immediately. Maybe b/c if I forget then its a disaster.

I use the method Rebel described and have never had an issue. I use a toothbrush to get into corners or details. When applicable, I start by removing most of the glue with a putty knife. The key is making sure all the glue is removed, use a rags, not a paper towel.

Forcing glue into pores is a myth, you will never have that problem if you do it right.

I’ve used Old Brown Glue a year past its expiration date with no issues. Premixed hide glue should be kept in refrigerator. Can’t comment on TB hide glue other than the few times I’ve used it I don’t like the smell.
 
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