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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a bookshelf and where the pieces meet, (like the runners that will support the shelves for instance), I was going to use wood screws and construction adhesive as well. Or would wood glue be better? I used screws and loctite construction adhesive when I build my subwoofer box, and that thing took so much abuse! In fact, the loctite was what I used to secure the air tube and the only thing that kept it in place. Held up like a champ. So, adhesive? woodglue? Does it really matter?
 

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I am building a bookshelf and where the pieces meet, (like the runners that will support the shelves for instance), I was going to use wood screws and construction adhesive as well. Or would wood glue be better? I used screws and loctite construction adhesive when I build my subwoofer box, and that thing took so much abuse! In fact, the loctite was what I used to secure the air tube and the only thing that kept it in place. Held up like a champ. So, adhesive? woodglue? Does it really matter?
To me when you say runners that support the shelves I'm seeing a cross grain problem. How to you plan to build this? A picture or two would be a help to see what you have planned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Imagine a 3/4 inch thick, 1 foot wide board standing 4 feet tall. And on this board, there are several 10 inch long pieces of 1x2 secured to the width of the board. These 1x2's will support the weight of the shelves. Runners maybe a bad choice of words. I'm not sure.
 

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A standard yellow wood glue would be more than strong enough to support the weight, assuming you're gluing side grain to side grain. It looks like that's what you're doing.
 

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doesn't sound like it me...

A standard yellow wood glue would be more than strong enough to support the weight, assuming you're gluing side grain to side grain. It looks like that's what you're doing.
Sounds like long grain on the vertical and long grain on the 1 X 2 supports at 90 degrees..... The screws will be better in an oversized or elongated hole. This is routinely done with little or no consequences, so you may be OK, I donno?

With dados in the verticals and glued, you will have a better condition to allow for expansion across the width. :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Really not that complicated. It's a board, getting screwed into another board (plywood). With wood glue between them. No bigs. I'm sure it would be fine with just a couple wood screws. I just wanted to reinforce it. Because. I'm a nube. And slightly paranoid about my own abilities to do this.
 

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Those would be called cleats. Either adhesive or glue will work, your choice. Normally the plywood grain would run the other direction and you are using construction plywood, not cabinet grade plywood. Don't sweat any of it, it's a first project and you are learning. Obviously, you need some bookshelves, go for it, you can step up your game later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for clearing up my ignorance of terminology! (not sarcasm, I'm serious) The plywood I'm using is not construction grade. I'm using AC sanded pine. While it is not a sheep of oak, I wouldn't call it construction grade. What is underneath the piece I'm using is some CDX though. Donated from a friend.
 

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Think HARD about Cabinetman's suggestion = holes and cleats for shelf supports.
My GF just dropped $25+k for a total new kitchen. All cabinets with adjustable shelf support. When you don't know for sure what to put where, supreme advantage.

I gutted the original kitchen, left only the paint on the walls. As in EMPTY room. Kinda fun. You all NEED 2 of the Lee Valley "Box Tools." Makes renno a dream (but loud).

Instead of a stumble for 2 people, there are now 4 or 5 work spaces. 2X the cupboard volume _and_ a built in DW.

corb: to directly answer your question about your application, yellow carpenter's glue (and clamps) should hold whatever load you need in a small book case. And, some construction adhesives are designed to stay pliable so some sag is a risk if you don't do your homework about what you buy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So when you (everyone) refers to shelf clips, are you referring to these? If so, the thought crossed my mind. I considered it. But I didn't think it would work to be honest. a 34.5 inch long shelf loaded with text books, notebooks, etc. I didn't think they would be up to the task. I also didn't think a 1/4 deep hole in sanded pine plywood would hold up the the challenge of supporting the wight either. Either the clip wouldn't hold, or the wood under the hole wouldn't hold. I just didn't have any faith in it.
 

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So when you (everyone) refers to shelf clips, are you referring to these? If so, the thought crossed my mind. I considered it. But I didn't think it would work to be honest. a 34.5 inch long shelf loaded with text books, notebooks, etc. I didn't think they would be up to the task. I also didn't think a 1/4 deep hole in sanded pine plywood would hold up the the challenge of supporting the wight either. Either the clip wouldn't hold, or the wood under the hole wouldn't hold. I just didn't have any faith in it.
Yes, those shelf supports will work just fine. I've never had one break. You would drill a ¼" diameter hole, about 3/8" deep. They will hold without wallowing out the hole. If you are concerned with that happening, you could install metal grommets like below.
Product Plumbing fitting Pipe Auto part Tool socket






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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I will strongly consider it. Should I drill the holes out before I stain and poly? Or after? I believe I remember hearing someone here mention using peg board as a template for drilling the holes (put tape over every other hole). Sounds like a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
could / should I use 3 clips per side? It's a 12 in deep shelf, it's not like I don't have room to spare here...
 

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It sounds like you're concerned that the 3/4" thick plywood wouldn't hold up to the weight of the books you plan to put on the shelf. If it does in fact sag from the weight of the books you could add the cleats/runners you already described and still have the shelves adjustable. You could put the side uprights in a position that will allow the shelf clips and still have a 1x2 along the front edge of the shelf. If the shelf will in fact be plywood then the 1x2 would give it a nice finished look, make it stronger, and even hide the shelf clips if you don't want people to see them. You could even add a 1x2 along the back edge of the shelf if you really wanted to stiffen it up, but I doubt it would be needed unless you're trying to stick a few bricks on the darn thing.
 

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I will strongly consider it. Should I drill the holes out before I stain and poly? Or after? I believe I remember hearing someone here mention using peg board as a template for drilling the holes (put tape over every other hole). Sounds like a great idea.
I would drill first. Peg board works good as a template.

could / should I use 3 clips per side? It's a 12 in deep shelf, it's not like I don't have room to spare here...
Only two clips per side will do.






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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Am I going to have to take some of the width off of the shelves to account for the thickness of bracket? I would think the combined thickness of brackets on both sides would be close to 1/8 inch.
 

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Definitely a better solution using the shelf clips. I used cleats in a project to accomplish the same thing you are trying to do and I wish I would have just used the clips. The shelfs are removable and it works fine, but it was a lot of unnecessary measuring and adjusting to get them aligned and glued/clamped.

Never thought of using pegboard as a template, that's awesome.
 

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Am I going to have to take some of the width off of the shelves to account for the thickness of bracket? I would think the combined thickness of brackets on both sides would be close to 1/8 inch.
Can you use these? Brusso Shelf Supports, then you don't have to trim.

Here is a link to some ideas Here

If that's not what you were talking about, disregard :)
 
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