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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am replacing the countertops in my kitchen and have decided to build my own (with some help from my boyfriend and dad) and am just curious as to any advice or pros and cons anyone would have to offer... We are going to use 2" tongue and groove boards and I would love everyones ideas on painting vs. staining and the best way to seal them. Any input would be appreciated! :no:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My cabinets are also wood, do you think that will be too much of a wood look?

I had thought of leaving them natural and making the walls pop with some bold colors...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the input. :no:

I was trying to find out the difference between the oil based and water based polyurethane but I like the idea that the oil based will give it an amber tint... I think it will look great!
 

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What kind of wood are you planning to use for the counter tops? If it is 2" T & G roof decking, which is what is available in most lumber yards, it will be cedar or pine. Both are very soft and will dent and scratch easily. You could get hard maple milled with a T & G edge. That would give you a hard, durable work surface. Most butcher block tops are made from maple. You will need to use chopping blocks and plastic preparation sheets when making meals to keep the counter tops in good condition even if you apply poly or epoxy as a finish. Also, if you use T & G that is not glued together you will get cracks between the boards where food can get into. Liquids getting into the cracks will be the worst thing. Be aware of that.

Another option would be to use a plywood underneath and use T & G 3/4" flooring as the countertop. I did this at a commercial bar installation. The top was finished with an epoxy coating. See the pictures. (Use the forward arrow to see other pictures...

https://mnsawyerswoodworkingandartworks.shutterfly.com/pictures/195
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Im not sure what type of wood it would be, my dad is getting it for me.. I'll let him know about the plywood idea... Will I be able to use a small amout of wood filler in the cracks before I sand and seal to keep things from going down into the cracks?
 

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You can use wood filler in the cracks. Watch this video. You will see that the epoxy will fill all the cracks and act as a glue (to some degree). I did not do the finish on the commercial bar. The owner did it. He had done other bar tops before. I think they used the product used in the video. There are several other Youtube videos on epoxy bart top finishing, as well...

 

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Woodworking Wanderer
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When I did my wood countertop I ended up painting the cabinets white. Not "too much" wood, but the '70's oak cabinets just looked butt-ugly (a highly technical term) above the beautiful American Cherry butcher block. I put in cherry laminate flooring to compliment the counters...felt like matching shoes and belt!

Too much wood? Never. Dated 70's oak, there is too much of.

Good luck on the countertop project...we'd love to see photos as you go along.

James
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am going to take before and after photos of the whole kitchen and I'll post them... I'm really excited about getting the project started... Now if I can just decide on a paint color and get a few days off work to get started I'll be in business...

I think the wood on wood will go nicely with bold paint choices...
 

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I made my counters out of construction grade hem fir. Ripped them and glued them together. Then I stained them with a walnut color, forget the actual name though. Top coated them with Waterlox Original, a bunch of coats. Made 17lf of counter for a total of 125 bucks. They are soft and damage easily, but that's what makes my house house a home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
That is beautiful and exactly the reason I want to do this... I plan on using cutting boards and prep mats to make sure they get damaged as little as possible but I know thats not going to keep every little scratch off, but like you said thats what makes a house a home!

How long have you had them, and have you noticed anything that you particularly don't like about them or the biggest drawbacks?
 

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I wouldn't use wood around the sink no matter how it's finished.



He's right about the sink and kitchen counter-tops in general, wood and water don't mix.
It doesn't mater how much you protect the counter from scratches, the moisture will get under the finish and wreak havoc.
I've seen it tried plenty of times and Mennonites do that here in Belize with Mahogany and they all look terrible after a short while.
.
 
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