Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been throwing my rags for staining or poly into my wood burning stove, I figure if it does do any spontaneous combustion, so what...not doing much damage in there, never burned it, just used it for storage until it was dry and safe then pulled them out and threw them away. My question is now that winter is upon me and i am using my stove, can I burn these rags, is that a safe practice. I am wondering about the fumes it might cause.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
If you have another method for disposal I wouldn't burn them. It can be harmful if the smoke were inhaled - it also puts some really nasty chemicals into the environment.

I'm not sure, but I think it is illegal in all of the USA to burn any plastic material - which would include polyurethane. Exceptions of course would include legal incinerators with very expensive smoke scrubbers installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,758 Posts
If they are old rags they would burn alright. In hot weather you run the risk of a minor explosion when it's fresh. In the event of spontaneous combustion in the confined space of a stove it could be more explosive than you think. When I was about 17 I started throwing shovels of wood shavings in the wood stove I had in my dads garage. One day I thought I put too much in there and smothered the fire out. I opened the door and looked in and you would have thought someone was in there with a flame thrower. The fire came out and burnt my hair and eyebrows and set fire to some sawdust on the opposite wall of the garage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,932 Posts
Why not follow the well known normal and accepted methods of handling potentially combustible rags? Place them in a tight lidded can of water so they are covered by the water. It's exposure to the air and oxygen that causes ignition, possibly with explosive results. The rag can should be emptied daily. You can spread the rags out or hang them to dry and then dispose of them. Oily rags are one of the most common causes of shop fires and easily avoided. The coarse of action should be to eliminate this possibility.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top