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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, I bought the Grinder and Wolverine Jig package from Woodcraft last weekend. I just got it set up.... everything is flush and centered...we are squared away on that....WOOHOO!!:gunsmilie:

For those of you who own one....Do you use the grinding wheels that come with this? I believe they are 80 grit and 120 grit. Thats what they told me.

I ask because I just sharpened my bowl gouge (was already sharp, didnt need to ) to just use the grinder and jig for the first time. I touched the gouge to the 120 grit wheel and rotated left then right....everything worked perfect!!! My only concern is that the tool was almost to hot to touch????? Did I leave it on there to long? The grinding wheel? My tools are Henry Taylor Kryo... i assume good quality tools? Is this just normal? (still new to turning and sharpening)

I also thought my tool bounced a little on the wheel? I'm thinking I need to balance my wheel? Any advice on this would be greatly appreciated

Thanks, Ack
 

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Wolverine jig and sharpening

Sounds like you have a high speed grinder.I use the slow speed one,1725 rpm.I have that setup and the only time the tool will get hot is if I am changing the angle of the grind on a new tool,but once I get the angle I want,I just set up the jig and one or two lite passes and the tool is sharp.May get a little warm,but not real hot.Or you may be applying to much pressure.
 

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Have you trued up the wheels? You tool shouldn't be bouncing on the wheel.
It seems you are using the jig the first time, you may be shaping the tool to fit your jig setting. If you are heavy handed, the tool may get hot, especially on the fine wheel. The OEM wheels that came with the Woodcraft slow speed grinders are not great wheels, but they are usable. You have to dress them often to remove the embedded metal particles. Otherwise a glazed wheel would also run hot. Use light pressure as suggested.
The WC grinders do not have very consistent quality control. Anchor your diamond wheel dresser against the wheel platform to true up the wheels first (don't allow the dresser to follow the contour of the wheel). If your wheels run true, no vibration, you may not need the balancing system.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think you solved the vibration problem I had. I anchored the dresser against the wheel and now have very little vibration. I am using a slow speed grinder 1725 rpm. Next time I sharpen the tools I will make a concentrated effort to keep a light touch. Thanks guys. Happy Easter
 

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Quench

I have a really crappy grinding wheel. I should get something better but I don't have the cash. However, I have found that quenching the tool in water before it gets the chance to heat up gives a much sharper cutting surface. Sometimes I get lazy and try to sharpen without water and I end up with a dull soft blade.
 

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Quenching in water doesn't really have anything to do with sharpening quality. However if you tool gets too hot to hold it might. If you don't have a sharp edge then you may not be grinding all the way to the tip. Use a light touch and watch for the sparks to fly over the tip. When your done you should feel a burr on the inside of the flute. This will go away almost immediately when you start to cut so you don't need to remove it.
Quenching is really only necessary if you are using carbon steel tools. On those tools if you overheat the edge by turning it blue you remove the hardness and it won't hold an edge as long until you grind past that point.
High Speed Steel tools don't need to be quenched. If you are grinding them and they get hot your using too much pressure. Sometimes when reshaping an edge they will get quite hot. I try to cool them by frequently dipping them in water so they don't get hot. You can't damage them by overheating with a grinder.
 
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