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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the best technique to create a window crossette as seen on historical homes? Do you need special trim? Or can you start with flat window trim casing and edge the bump out and perimeter with a fancy moulding? I can not find any photos or installation tips on where to start or what stock to use? Any help is appreciated....
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Old School
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Usually crossette design falls into the general period or style of the building, including any details of the windows or doors that they are to appear. The actual design can be attributed to a specific period. There is nothing stopping you from creating a pleasing look with a pattern that compliments the door or window trim.
 

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After my posting I realized I didn't help you to decide exactly how to do this. The "crossette" or sometimes called a "Greek Ear" like this:
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Is basically a moulding that has a profile that is used at the end of a window or door that returns. You can make that moulding or buy something that will be complimentary to the design of the trim used or the period that you are adding to. An example of this moulding could be:

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Or, a typical casing moulding that you could cut down to a narrow width, but starting out with a stock width, like this:
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Or use a moulding or part of a moulding that you could trim to fit the design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the welcome and the response cabinetman! The return on that greek ear looks like a 135 degree cut joining a 45. Is the moulding used meant to be a decorative edger complimenting the main flat window trim OR is this greek ear possible with only 3.5" windsor trim and no edge moulding. If only one trim is needed with no edger, it appears you would need 3 different cut pieces;the longer vertical piece meeting the shorter vertical piece at a 135/45 miter angle to form the bottom return on the ear; and the shorter vertical piece meeting the top horizontal piece at a 45/45 miter to create the top return. If not, I imagine appling a smaller moulding with a back rabbit edge running along the entire perimeter of the flat window trim that would feature a longer window header top piece. Am I on the right track? I am surprised there are no diagrams or instructions on how to cut a greek ear. If it is only possible by using an outer edging agains the main window trim then I feel stupid for making it seem complicated....
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What you can do is a full size drawing of the corner, and lay out your own pattern that falls within the scale of the existing trim or will replace it. If you search the net under headings like "crossette", or "Greek Ear" or just subjects like "exterior window and door trim", or "architectural trim", you may find examples, and details. I've done similar designs on cabinets and entry doors, but they were my own pattern. It does get tricky when the profile has to follow and then have a transition point. It's almost like one of those "mazes", if you follow what I mean.

So, doing a full size drawing of the detail, or a scale that is large enough to really see, like 1 1/2" = 1'-0", or maybe 3" = 1'-0". If you don't have an architectural scale ruler, pick one up, even one of those cheapo white plastic triangular ones.
 
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