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Hey everyone, I am fairly new to wood working, ive had some experience, but I want to get into it more as it has always fascinated me. I am currently venturing into a project, to build a beautiful custom PC Case out of wood.
I have thought about the types of wood, I know we will be using hard wood, but I am still concerned about moisture and warping. Which led me to design custom moisture packet holders, now the main question I have is the validity to this idea, and the practicality of reinforcing parts of the case with steel bars, along the lines of using a press to drill though the sides, in the exact size of the rods, coat them in glue and force them in. Would this help in any way? Anyway, thank you!
 

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when you say "PC" case, are you talking about a Personal Computer
on a desk or one of those giant floor models in an office setting.
do you have a drawing or sketch available ?
properly built with ventilation, there should be NO moisture at all to be concerned with.
glue does not stick to steel - so you really need to explain your building process
with either photos of something similar or drawings of what you want to do.
green, uncured wood would be the only source of moisture, IMHO.
the heat generated by a computer will alleviate any chance of moisture
problems. moreover, constant heat on some woods will cause warpage
because the wood becomes too dry too quick. so much thought has to be
into the ventilation of the case - not desiccant packs.
my simple thought process is to build your computer in the standard metal
box - then build the wood case around that - so the whole computer can be
removed for maintenance, upgrades, etc.

side note: with your remarkable ability to build computers from scratch
and zero knowledge of wood . . . and me with zero knowledge of computers
and the remarkable ability to build things out of wood puts us on an equal plane.
(that is meant to be humorous and a compliment to you).

.

.
 

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Hey everyone, I am fairly new to wood working, ive had some experience, but I want to get into it more as it has always fascinated me. I am currently venturing into a project, to build a beautiful custom PC Case out of wood.
I have thought about the types of wood, I know we will be using hard wood, but I am still concerned about moisture and warping. Which led me to design custom moisture packet holders, now the main question I have is the validity to this idea, and the practicality of reinforcing parts of the case with steel bars, along the lines of using a press to drill though the sides, in the exact size of the rods, coat them in glue and force them in. Would this help in any way? Anyway, thank you!

I think moisture packets inside the case would defeat the purpose, as wood movement is a result of moisture imbalance. The inside of the case would be dry, and the outside subject to ambient moisture. As the outside moisture content increases, warpage is prone.


As to steel bars, any attempt to restrict the normal expansion/contraction of wood will lead to warping and cracking. Best bet is avoiding any design where movement across the wood is restricted by a piece being glued cross grain to another wider piece, and using a finish such as polyurethane for moisture protection.
 

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when you say "PC" case, are you talking about a Personal Computer
on a desk or one of those giant floor models in an office setting.
do you have a drawing or sketch available ?
properly built with ventilation, there should be NO moisture at all to be concerned with.
glue does not stick to steel - so you really need to explain your building process
with either photos of something similar or drawings of what you want to do.
green, uncured wood would be the only source of moisture, IMHO.
the heat generated by a computer will alleviate any chance of moisture
problems. moreover, constant heat on some woods will cause warpage
because the wood becomes too dry too quick. so much thought has to be
into the ventilation of the case - not desiccant packs.
my simple thought process is to build your computer in the standard metal
box - then build the wood case around that - so the whole computer can be
removed for maintenance, upgrades, etc.

side note: with your remarkable ability to build computers from scratch
and zero knowledge of wood . . . and me with zero knowledge of computers
and the remarkable ability to build things out of wood puts us on an equal plane.
(that is meant to be humorous and a compliment to you).

.

.



Building a PC is like building an AR platform gun, there is no real building to it just installing parts, as a matter of fact this computer I am using today was assembled by me. Not that I am trying to belittle ones ability, it is a pretty straight forward task
 

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where's my table saw?
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My son, the computer geek ...

I watched my son assemble a new enclosure for his gaming computer. The new case weighs 40 lbs, made of glass and steel with 5 cooling fans .. at present time... plans to add more. It's water cooled even with all those fans, there's more to come as he adds more powerful boards.

Ok, that's an extreme I suppose, but HEAT is the enemy of electronics. If you want to make a wood enclosure, be aware of the cooling aspects. As long as the heat is expelled, the wood won't expand or contract very much. I'd say it's a bit risky, but nothing will blow up, just fail to operate....... :vs_cool:
 

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John mentioned using a standard PC case and then using wood to contain it. You could also start with a standard case, replace the covers, face and all with wood. Just keeping the basic frame for the strength you need in certain areas. Kind of a hybrid you know. Heck my hips made out of titanium but you cant tell from the outside, lol.
 

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Generic Weeb
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Just finished my gaming PC a little bit ago and was going to build a wooden case for it but opted not to as nice cases aren't that expensive. If you're going to do it i'd use plywood. Don't have to worry about it moving a whole bunch, it's pretty easy to build a box from and assuming you're going to try to sell them it's certainty cheaper than solid wood. Make sure you've got plenty of ventilation in it. Nothing more annoying than a pc overheating and crashing.



-T
 
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