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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any earthly reason someone would use a jig saw to cut a straight line? I'm shopping for a jig saw for when I need to cut a wavy line, or for cutting out plywood patterns. I keep seeing advertised features on these saws such as edge guides and lasers for straight line cuts, and the images shown in the ads show long, straight cuts being made by them. A jig saw is not a tool I'd choose to cut a straight line. A circular saw with an edge guide seems it would be a far better option, if a table saw could not be used. To me, a laser on a jig saw seems to be a worthless feature.
 

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Is there any earthly reason someone would use a jig saw to cut a straight line? I'm shopping for a jig saw for when I need to cut a wavy line, or for cutting out plywood patterns. I keep seeing advertised features on these saws such as edge guides and lasers for straight line cuts, and the images shown in the ads show long, straight cuts being made by them. A jig saw is not a tool I'd choose to cut a straight line. A circular saw with an edge guide seems it would be a far better option, if a table saw could not be used. To me, a laser on a jig saw seems to be a worthless feature.
The only reason I can think of is if a jig saw was all a person had. In that situation a person could make use of the guide however it would be important to mark a like and keep careful control of where it was cutting. The guide would just help control the saw. I imagine the laser is just a gumic to sell saws. You know people like gadgets and the inexperienced person would think it would help.
 

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A laser on just about any tool is a useless option. My CMS, circular saw and drill press all have lasers. I dont use the lasers on any of them. I had to take the batteries out of the one on CMS because it came on by centriphical motion rather than a switch. Lasers dont do anything but make it hard to see what Im doing. Its a gimmick for people who dont know any better.

Now on to your question. My BIL makes stereo and CB boxes for truckers that work for companies that have slip seat operations. Some of his boxes sell for $1500. He builds them in his dining room as its his only work space. He dosnt have a TS set up in there for obvious reasons and says a circular saw makes too much mess. His only power tools are a jig saw, palm sander and a cordless drill.

I recently restored and modified an aluminum boat. I basically turned a small flat bottom jon boat into a fishing machine with carpeted decks and storage and what not. I didnt use a single piece of wood on my boat. It was an all aluminum build. My framing and decking material were all cut with a jigsaw with a fine tooth metal blade. It was just simpler to use the jigsaw.

I dont think companies are marketing jigsaws to replace anything, especially since all these companies make other saws as well. It just gives customers more options.
 

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Sink cutouts was my first thought. If the countertop has a backsplash even if you do it before installing you very well may not fit a circular saw in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is no reason they can't be used for straight cuts so why not make it a selling feature, most of my circular saws came with an edge guide as well, can't recall last time I used one, or where they are for that matter.
My circular saw makes fantastic straight cuts with an edge guide and Freud Diablo ripping blade. On a jig saw, I figure the cut is so slow compared to other saws that there's much more room for error in making crooked cuts from hand wobble. I'm much more likely to hold a straight line with an edge guide if I'm quick through the cut in one fluid motion.
 

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Just this past Christmas i built a oak hopechest. I cut out all my panels with my bosch js470eb jig saw. I tried my circular saw but the quality of the cut didn't even compare to my jig saw with a fine metal blade. The veneered finish didn't chip a bit. Took a bit longer yes but much better quality IMHO.
 

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My circular saw makes fantastic straight cuts with an edge guide and Freud Diablo ripping blade. On a jig saw, I figure the cut is so slow compared to other saws that there's much more room for error in making crooked cuts from hand wobble. I'm much more likely to hold a straight line with an edge guide if I'm quick through the cut in one fluid motion.
With a proper blade for the cut, and an edge guide, allowing the saw to cut without pushing and forcing will give good results. The drift on jig saws are mostly from operator induced pressures.




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