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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Why is the cut pictured here bogging down my saw? It’s green Eastern White Pine. The deeper I go, the more bogged down it gets. It’s making a lot of steam from the wood (no scorch marks, so it’s not smoke).

The saw crosscuts it easily. I know this is not a standard use of the saw. What’s happening that’s causing it to bog down? Is it just the blade, or is it because of how the front of the blade is buried in the wood? Would a rip blade work for this cut better. Or is the geometry of how the blade is hitting the wood no good?

Am I damaging the motor by making these cuts? I’ve done 14 with 4 more to go, so I’m just going to finish it up, but I want to understand what’s happening so I can find a better solution next time.

WWT - miter saw bogging down 1.jpg

WWT - miter saw bogging down 2.jpg

Sorry, I can’t rotate these on the iPad.
 

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David
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Here are some photo posting tips if you’re using your phone or iPad – the best way for proper orientation is to shoot landscape (widescreen). Rotate your phone or iPad CCW for proper orientation. If you want your photos to be portrait then open the photo in a viewer on your computer, rotate it to the orientation you want, then save it in that orientation. It will be correct when you upload it to the servers here. If you’re shooting video please shoot widescreen like our monitors, not portrait.

How wet is the wood? How sharp is your blade? Yes, a rip blade would work better.

David

Edit - I rotated them for you
 

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where's my table saw?
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What they said ^

Wrong blade for ripping and wet wood leads to steam from the heat generated by excess friction. The blade is probably gummed up by now and should be cleaned with Simple Green, the Industrial purple version. Soak it for at least an hour and scrub the gum away with a brass brush. Then you can make 8 more cuts .... maybe?
:|
 
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As steam is generated in the saw kerf, it applies pressure against the disk of the blade. As the steam increases (and can't escape) it acts like disk break pads... squeezing against the rotors. The blade of your saw can get hot enough to warp the blade permanently.
 

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All of the above advice is good. Cleaning the blade, different blade, etc.

How are you cutting it? Are you trying to drive the blade all the way down in one pass? If so, try cutting it in multiple passes: score it, let the blade rest, score a little deeper, rest, ...
 

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You are ripping with a crosscut blade, therefore building up a lot of heat.

Yes, you could be damaging your saw motor.

I would either buy a construction blade or but the tenons with a hand saw.

BTW now you have an excuse to buy a bandsaw!!
 

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That Guy
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When you overwork a motor it gets hot which in turn causes it to heat-soak, this increases the resistance of the winding and decreases the power of the motor. It's also a spiral effect, as the resistance increases the amount of heat generated and power decreases so you push harder and it has to draw more current which causes more heat, if you're not careful the temperature will suddenly spike and the varnish on the winding wires will crack and the motor will fail.

Keep an eye on the temp of the motor and make sure you observe the recommended duty cycle for the saw. On for one minute idle for one to three minutes is a good baseline when you're underpowered. Try to hold the trigger on and let the saw run without cutting anything, (twist tie or tye-wrap) there should be a fan impeller in the motor that will cool it faster than just leaving it sit.
 

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Ancient Termite
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OK, Saw Blades

There are others but the teeth type of concern here are Alternating Top Bevel (ATB) and Raker (R). ATB teeth are intended to cut through the fibers, slicing them neatly. R teeth are intended to claw their way through along the fibers. R teeth can be identified from 10 feet away because they are accompanied by a large gullet. The large gullet easily cleans out the long fibers for an efficient rip cut.

Because 99% of cuts on a miter saw are cross cut, finding a blade with gullets and a negative hook angle can be difficult. Although a combination radial arm saw blade could be used. I would never suggest that you use a table saw blade in a miter saw.

To make your cuts, I would suggest using a straight bit in a router. Clamp the 4x4 piece between two 4x4 scraps. The scraps would support the router during the cutting process. Allow the scraps to extend beyond the end of the piece with the tenon. A piece of ¾ scrap across the two 4x4 scraps can be a fence to insure nice straight shoulders on your tenons. The process will be a little tedious but a safe way to accomplish what you need.
 
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