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Termite
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Speed controllers were going out on my Dewalt 625 on raised panel bits. Sometimes they will work on their own but most times they have to be replaced. They were pretty cheap, but not anymore..
 

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Dropping a tool 20 feet onto concrete is more a problem when you have employees than for the DIYer that is the only one using it. Do you hand these guys a $200 tool or a $50 tool that does the same job?
 

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Dropping a tool 20 feet onto concrete is more a problem when you have employees than for the DIYer that is the only one using it. Do you hand these guys a $200 tool or a $50 tool that does the same job?
Better the tool than the employee. Most companies write off expenses...
 

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Dropping a tool 20 feet onto concrete is more a problem when you have employees than for the DIYer that is the only one using it. Do you hand these guys a $200 tool or a $50 tool that does the same job?
Where I worked dropping anything heavy like a power tool 20 feet to the concrete would be considered a safety issue and likely dealt with accordingly.
 

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a lot of people do not seem to like Ryobi. I have several tools made by them. They seem to work just fine.

Can anyone give me some insight into this? What gives? Is Ryobi bad?
Ryobi is not "bad" but it's far from good. Ryobi power tools are a better choice than Black & Decker, Stanley, & department store brand power tools, but they're v e r y f a r from good in the way Milwaukee, Makita, Flex, or even Dewalt are good.

For an occasional use tool, Ryobi is fine. I bought a set when the One+ line first came out in the blue color. But when I began using mine more & more often, I started noticing all the problems with them. My first drill gave out around the time the green tools came into stores. The green one didn't last long either...

I've since owned Dewalt, Kobalt (24V Max on par with Dewalt for most of the tools), and Flex, and have used at work Milwaukee, Metabo HPT (Hitachi), & Craftsman (about equal to, or slightly better than, Ryobi), I have found Flex to be most to my liking and am giving away my old tools & building a Flex set.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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My FIL was a wonderful woodworker and made a lot of things over the years. All of his tools were Craftsman. When he passed, his sons wanted no part of them because they were just Craftsman stuff, not PM or PC. That "stuff" is in my shop now and I am grateful and just a bit proud every time I pick one of them up to use.
 
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Nothing wrong with Craftsman tools. They were the go to tools before the big box...
 

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Nothing wrong with Craftsman tools. They were the go to tools before the big box...
Nothing wrong with Craftsman tools from before Sears sold the brand name to Stanley Black & Decker. Today's Craftsman is not even close to the quality of the old Sears stuff.
 

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Stanley was in cabinet shops in the 70's when I started..

I hear a lot of "before" with many brands..
 

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Everything Stanley/BD touches turns cheap.

I’m fearful for DW that’s why I bough Mil. PC went down the tubes fast.

Two 12v DW drills I bough snout 5 years apart you can see the difference in the chuck quality

Coman us no where near what it was. Tools made in China.
 

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Yet everywhere you look, there they are...

Dewalt as many are trying to keep prices down. If there prices raise , sales go down..

Tooling demands are a lot different between home and work..
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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Ryobi has been moving some tool production out of China. Not a lot, but it's a start.
 

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Use a Milwaukee impact deliver and you’ll see why.

It is probably tool specific, I bought the impact driver and a few misc lights etc, but had so much trouble with Ryobi batteries I gave everything away.
well I've got a milwaukee here that my 1/2 ryobi impact will run circles around all day long! milwaukee won't even come close to removing the lugs off my 2500HD but the ryobi will and without issue.
 

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Nothing wrong with Craftsman tools from before Sears sold the brand name to Stanley Black & Decker. Today's Craftsman is not even close to the quality of the old Sears stuff.
Stanley Black & Decker is building a plant in Ft Worth Texas to bring wrench & socket manufacturing back to the USA. On the Craftsman website that location says "coming soon". Hopefully the quality level will improve.
 

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Many Sears Craftsman electric tools were made by Ryobi, at least that was true back in the 1990s. I didn't follow Sears/Craftsman much after that, so I can't speak of the tools after the 90s. Ryobi was probably barely known back then. If you look at the model number on a Craftsman tool and it starts with 315, it was made by Ryobi. Model numbers back then looked like 315.XXXXX (fill in the Xs with numbers). The 3 numbers before the "." showed who made the product. Back then, some Craftsman (like the "commercial" line) came from B&D (code 900). The Craftsman worm drive circular saw was a Skil (code 135).
 

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I checked my cabinet, too many tools. 2 Ryobi tools; a miniature biscuit jointer (Sears quit making them but I loaded up on biscuits) and an angle grinder. I don't use either but once or twice a year. I'll bet most pros have a few in their shop, but for safety against repetitive use injury, we look for the best feel in the hand. Mostly a turner, and couldn't imagine turning on a Ryobi lathe or running 25 bowl blanks in a Ryobi band saw. Wasn't Ryobi the company sued by the man who lost a hand while cutting circles on a table saw? What a goof (my opine)...Delta sold their business to the Chinese amongst others rather the pay royalties to SawStop for a brake. Never getting rid of many of my older tools, though I did suck up and buy a SawStop...and it's a nice saw. Well, back to work! (Loved this thread:))
 

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I have Ryobi leaf blower and trimmer, I tried the 18v blower and that was terrible, wrote a poor review. They contacted me to return it and said if I remove the review they will upgrade me to the 40v model at no cost, so I got a leaf blower for free. I had a orbital sander for years and it worked fine, when the clutch went the replacement parts didn't last long and I finally dumped it and went with Dewalt, all my drills are Rigid, one battery system, what I like about Rigid is there is a lifetime battery warranty.
 

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I realize everyone has preference when it comes to brand.

I’m not so much dedicated to one brand. I have tools from several different brands.

One thing I’ve noticed though is a lot of people do not seem to like Ryobi. I have several tools made by them. They seem to work just fine.

Can anyone give me some insight into this? What gives? Is Ryobi bad?
I have had a half dozen Ryobi laminate trimmers. I like to use the same power tool in various jigs I have, and choose to have, multiples rather than move the power tool from jig to jig. A couple of years ago I converted to Ryobi laminate trimmers in several jigs. I liked the height adjustment and a few other details. However, the brushes in every one of them reacted with some of the other metal in the trimmer body and they all stopped working within a year. To get the old brushes, which were totlly frozen in their track, out required totally dismantling the tool. That made the trimmers way too complicated to use. I got rid of all of them and went back to Makita cordless trimmers. Amazing routers. Never had any problem with a Makita or Hitachi router, and I have had lots of them.
 

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Looking at the price of the PC 310, I can see why woodworkers started looking st cheaper laminate routers..
 

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Can anyone give me some insight into this? What gives? Is Ryobi bad?

I pick my current tools based on years of previous experiences that I have had.

Before cordless, almost everything I owned was from Craftsman. Back then, they weren’t the most advanced tools, but you could pretty much count on them doing what was needed.
When I first started out with cordless tools, I was a fan of Porter Cable. Their tools that I bought in the 80’s and 90’s were of excellent quality, and reasonably priced. But then in the early 2000’s, I started having issues where parts would fail, and I found out that Porter Cable does a poor job of making/stocking repair parts, except for the most recent models. I had nearly-new tools with broken triggers or gears that I couldn’t get replacement parts for.

I then went on to DeWalt. They make some of the best cordless drills on the market, but I had issues with some other tools that they made. I wanted to keep within one brand, because the batteries are so expensive, so I looked for another brand that made quality tools throughout their line.

I tried a few of the Ryobi cordless tools. Overall, they weren’t built as tough as some of the other tools that I had, but they performed reasonably well for light to medium-duty work. My biggest problem with Ryobi is with their batteries. They are prone to overheating, and they don’t hold a charge nearly as well as other brands.

Now, I have Milwaukee cordless tools. They are too expensive in my mind, but I am sticking with them because they hold up everything that I have done to them. I don’t like to keep buying tools, and hope that the quality of Milwaukee stayed where it is. They always work when I need them.
 
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