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When I started out your DYI tools of choice were Sears Craftsmen tools. Now you have Ryobi, Kobalt. Ryobi is made byTechtronic Industries also owns Milwaukee Electric Tool, AEG (AEG Powertools, licensed from Electrolux), Homelite, Hoover US, Dirt Devil, and Vax. Lowe's Kobalt are tools are power tools are made by China and Germany based Chevron Tools, Those and a few others are all good DYI choice. I have had one or two of each over the years. I have become a Dewalt fan the last 10 years.But looking at the small Ryboi compound saw. I have a friend who is a profesenal trim carpenter who loves his.
 

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Never owned anything made by them. But I have had Black and Decker tools and some of the other consumer brands. When I have replaced them with a higher quality tool I have (almost) always been impressed with the quality and how much better they worked.

That is why I wouldn't buy them. Why you would or wouldn't I can't say.
 

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Termite
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I had a Ryobi laminate router I bought at a pawn shop. Came in the box with wrenches. I didn't trust it but needed anot her router at work. I took it and used it to rough out laminate. I left it there..

Ive never worked with Ryobi other than that..
 

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I think If i had to start all over as a diy er, I think I'd be hitting Ryobi, HF and Craftsman and build up on diy tools.

Does the tool make the woodworker or does the woodworker make the tool. In my opinion it's both..
 

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Rebel, I think an experienced person is affected less by a cheap tool than a newbie. At least they know what makes a tool good or better. It all depends on what you're talking about. Some of it is production related, some accuracy. Hand tools a whole different story.

I'm like you, I gave Ryobi a chance. Before the batteries went bad I thought the Ryobi impact was pretty good for the money. When I said it doesn't compare to a Milwaukee 18V, it simply doesn't. Maybe they've fixed the battery issue.

You buy what you can afford, but people aren't "elitists" or tool snobs b/c they either want or can afford a better quality tool.

If I were starting out, I'd probably go with Ryobi.
 

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Termite
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When I started out, even the schools had large Delta machinery, but the portable tools were Stanley, Craftsman, etc. When I entered the commercial business, it was the same. Between 81-83 the commercial shop stepped up and bought Milwaukee belt sanders, for me this was the turning point. I remember some of those old Stanley routers making it into the 90's before disappearing...

I do have B&D router because it has the light which was good for routing to marks on cabinets, but most now just rout till the end of the base hits edge and call it good...
 

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snip

You buy what you can afford, but people aren't "elitists" or tool snobs b/c they either want or can afford a better quality tool.

If I were starting out, I'd probably go with Ryobi.
I agree, if you can afford it, enjoy it, just don't look down on those that can't afford the best.
 

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Rebel, I think an experienced person is affected less by a cheap tool than a newbie. At least they know what makes a tool good or better. It all depends on what you're talking about. Some of it is production related, some accuracy. Hand tools a whole different story.

I'm like you, I gave Ryobi a chance. Before the batteries went bad I thought the Ryobi impact was pretty good for the money. When I said it doesn't compare to a Milwaukee 18V, it simply doesn't. Maybe they've fixed the battery issue.

You buy what you can afford, but people aren't "elitists" or tool snobs b/c they either want or can afford a better quality tool.

If I were starting out, I'd probably go with Ryobi.
People aren't elitists or tool snobs for buying what they can afford. There are those that are elitists and tool snobs that buy what they can afford and use it as a badge of superiority over others. instead of encouraging others along in the craft. Not all do, not many do, but those that do tend to be insufferable.
 

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I bought mine to make money. Now they just collect dust, rather than make it..
 

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"occasionally make some stuff" = OMSS - that's me all right
 
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My first Ryobi tool is the variable speed drill - its had a thrashing and still runs, which is more than I can say for the Dewalt drill of a similar type that got consigned to the trash bin.
 

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For what it's worth (and this discussion is pretty played out so I feel random comments are fair game at this point)

I have a lower opinion of someone with a premium tool with zero idea how to use it than I do of someone with a cheap tool with no idea how to use it.

I'm also not talking about the learning curve stage either.

When you buy a top of the line tool, you should back that up with some skill.

People with a drill from ryobi, black and decker etc...it's zero judgment from me when you break those out once a year on Christmas eve to unscrew grandma because she got wrapped up in the Christmas tree again after a little too many wine coolers.
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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As the cabinet maker I worked with one summer used to say "It's a poor workman that blames his tools".
 
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As the cabinet maker I worked with one summer used to say "It's a poor workman that blames his tools".
When I worked at Jakobe they brought me a Dewalt 708 I couldn't get to cut square on both sides of the fence. They bought me a new dewalt slider. The motor went out a couple months later. They replaced the motor wit another broken saw and it ran perfect for many years.

Point to the story.... Because it's name brand doesn't mean it's perfect Sometimes you have to tweak them to get perfection.

I would assume that the demanding products from companies like Dewalt, , Milwaukee, Makita, etc will use better bearing, etc than the cheaper competitors. I remember a guy at a pawn shop said he took a DeWalt and a B&D jidpgsaw apart. They looked the same but the Dewalt was much heavier and more metal parts. I reme,be going in Sears amd seeing a Craftsman jigsaw that looked just like a Bosch..
 

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Many years ago I had a 72 Dodge truck, I broke several craftsman sockets loosening the wheel nuts to work on the brakes, final time I went into Sears I was dealing with the dept. manager, she went into the back and came out with a new socket, "Try this made in USA one, we keep them in the back for guys like you."
 

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All my (very many) power tools are Ryobi 18V, and I like them all, except that I have Bosch for my corded Jobsite Table Saw, corded sliding Compound Miter Saw and 4" belt sander and Work Drive circular saw, and a Makita corded planer and a Makita circular saw (sidewinder type). The last was an impulse purchase via Nextdoor. For reciprocating saws, I have a Ryobi for convenience and a corded DeWalt for serious cutting. Oh, and a Bosch sabre saw.
Hold on to that Bosch 4" belt sander. Best belt sander ever made. Mine died last year. I was shocked to find that the only game in town in a 4x24 is Makita, which I purchased. Gets the drop done, but does not hold a candle to my old Bosch. I
 

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It seems like once I get burned by one tool I will not buy another from that manufacturer. I own a 3HP VS router made by Ryobi. It sits in the bottom of my router drawer with the 6 other routers I use, Bosch and PC, piled on top of it because every time I tried to use that thing I would have to tear it apart mid-job and blow the dust out of the speed control. I bought it to spin large panel raiser bits and need the VS to work, not suddenly run full speed with a 3 inch diameter bit. So I no longer buy Ryobi. Same is true for Dewalt. Tools are not cheap and I do not like spending time repairing them that could be productive. Cheap tools have their place and I do buy them, usually at the HFT store, though. Those tools I consider single-use. If they last for a couple more uses I consider myself lucky. Ryobi I guess seeks to fill the vast middle niche, the one between single-use and those use every day, drop 20 feet on concrete, pick up and keep using tools I rely on.
 
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