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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I realize everyone has preference when it comes to brand.

I’m not so much dedicated to one brand. I have tools from several different brands.

One thing I’ve noticed though is a lot of people do not seem to like Ryobi. I have several tools made by them. They seem to work just fine.

Can anyone give me some insight into this? What gives? Is Ryobi bad?
 

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Use a Milwaukee impact deliver and you’ll see why.

It is probably tool specific, I bought the impact driver and a few misc lights etc, but had so much trouble with Ryobi batteries I gave everything away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have:

Biscuit Joiner
RO Sander
Corner Cat Sander
Handheld Planer
15 Amp 10” Tablesaw

I guess I have more than I realized. Haha. All of these work great. I try to steer clear of cordless in general except when it comes to drills. They seem like, unless a special situation, the best thing to have cordless.
 

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Some people have a stick up their rear and think that anything that isn't built for 24/7 industrial use is absolute garbage and anybody who doesn't shell out $2395 for a battery drill is a moron who can't manage their money properly

It's stupid elitism, pure and simple. Ryobi isn't the greatest, but their tools work fine for what they are, entry-level tools for homeowners and weekend warriors who deal with the occasional job
 

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I realize everyone has preference when it comes to brand.

I’m not so much dedicated to one brand. I have tools from several different brands.

One thing I’ve noticed though is a lot of people do not seem to like Ryobi. I have several tools made by them. They seem to work just fine.

Can anyone give me some insight into this? What gives? Is Ryobi bad?
Much comes down to how you use the tools, how much you use them, and what your expectations are. Another consideration is what tools do the manufacturer make, especially with cordless. Look at the line of tools Ryobi makes and compare it to Milwaukee, or Makita. Most guys do not want to have 3-4 different battery systems. I have two battery systems. I use Makita cordless for most of my shop tools, and Milwaukee cordless for my cordless nailers. I prefer these brands because of the heavy use I put them through, and their reliability. In defense of Ryobi when you are purchasing tools out of your own pocket, and not out of a business, it can be difficult to justify double the price, especially when the tool is for weekend use.
 

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Termite
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Ryobi isnt bad for the DIYer, but it depends on what you expect from it..
 

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The Nut in the Cellar
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I've had Ryobi tools since 1993 and have nearly two dozen 18 volt One+ tools. Almost all of the cordless tools are the old blue/yellow versions. Only one is a disappointment. The stapler/brad nailer is just a weak sister. I had six of the NiCad battery packs and had all of them rebuilt once by a local battery shop. I now have five of the LiOn packs and all have been just fine. My 1993 BT3000 table saw works like new as does the planer. I am a hobbyist, so everything gets light use, but everything works as advertised. Outdoors, I have a Ryobi 48 volt riding mower that has been flawless for the last 41 months. I also have a Ryobi 40 volt attachment capable string trimmer that uses Ryobi attachments that date from the '90s and a 40 volt 21" Whisper Series snowblower. The 40 volt batteries consist of 1 4 ahr., 2 6 ahr., and 2 7.5 ahr. packs with two rapid chargers. I expect add more Ryobi 40 volt tools. I was the Ryobi tool forum moderator/administrator for over ten years, so I may be a tad biased, but knowledgeable. Failed Ryobi tools: the FM radio died twice and was replaced under warranty both times. The last one still works.
 
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I have a Ryobi pressure washer that has a Honda engine. Normally starts on the first pull. No issues with it at all. I do winterize the pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a Ryobi pressure washer that has a Honda engine. Normally starts on the first pull. No issues with it at all. I do winterize the pump.
I had a Ryobi pressure washer also with a Honda engine. That thing was a trooper. I loved it.
 

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Egg Spurt
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They're just tools. Ryobi is your basic homeowner brand..Nothing wrong with them. I have 3 ryobi drills, 1 Dewalt..nope..make it 4 ryobies.. One is the old blue..
They're not my favorite brand, but when it comes to paying out of pocket when I need something replaced cheap its my go-to cheapo.. I got a great deal on Ryobi batteries last year, 6 for $99 so I'll probably stick with them until the batteries all die..
Hey! At least I still don't own any of the HF battery operated tools. I do have a cheapo HF oscillating saw dohicky.. And a boat load of their trash clamps I've been replacing with Universal clamps which I absolutely love..
Thinking of cheapo clamps which one would you rather have decorating your wall in your shop?
HF cheapo's covered in glue and sawdust?
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Gas Engineering Machine

OR
These beautiful, sleek and elegant brand spanking new Universals?
Wood Gas Engineering Machine tool Machine

It's the difference between a rich Corinthian leather interior or a plastic Ford Pinto interior.. LOL
Not that I ever really fell for the rich Corinthian leather story..it was pleather.. lol

Just in case you think I'm blowing smoke about them here's the real difference between the two..
Wall thickness and the rail notches are a lot closer and there's a whole lot less play in the pad parts..
Wood Rectangle Composite material Hardwood Flooring
 

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I think it is human nature to want to have made the best tool purchases, and the cheaper brands challenge that. You need to know you made a good investment by spending more, and so people that spent 2x the price of ryobi, etc want to put a lot of emphasis on those differences.

I've owned some cheaper tools and some of the biggest differences have been overall weight, durability, and dust collectuon.

Ryobi also has an advantage of mass production compared to some brands
 
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I have a what I would consider a very large assortment of the 18+ volt tools, dating back to the blue ones. Most of my collection is the newer bright yellow ones, with over 25 differant tools. I am a DIY'er, weekend warrior guy. Some of the tools I am not very easy on, such as impact driver (screw gun) has been through hell and back, and works just like it did on day one. I have over 12 batteries and use the 6 bay charger along with some singles. I also have the 40 volt hedge trimmer and chainsaw. Both of those have been outstanding purchases. No your not gonna cut down and buck a 36" diameter oak tree with it, but for trimming, and small wood work, it's a great option to add to the gas saw collection.

I certainly would not consider them junk or inferior. They are a very capable set of tools.
If you compare to other brands such as Milwaukee and Makita, they may not have all the tools, such as
PEX plumbing tools, or concrete tools, but I would consider those very specialized.

I would not have a problem recomending them to anyone. Yes, even the pro's.
 

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They're just tools. Ryobi is your basic homeowner brand..Nothing wrong with them. I have 3 ryobi drills, 1 Dewalt..nope..make it 4 ryobies.. One is the old blue..
They're not my favorite brand, but when it comes to paying out of pocket when I need something replaced cheap its my go-to cheapo.. I got a great deal on Ryobi batteries last year, 6 for $99 so I'll probably stick with them until the batteries all die..
Hey! At least I still don't own any of the HF battery operated tools. I do have a cheapo HF oscillating saw dohicky.. And a boat load of their trash clamps I've been replacing with Universal clamps which I absolutely love..
Thinking of cheapo clamps which one would you rather have decorating your wall in your shop?
HF cheapo's covered in glue and sawdust?
View attachment 434744
OR
These beautiful, sleek and elegant brand spanking new Universals?
View attachment 434745
It's the difference between a rich Corinthian leather interior or a plastic Ford Pinto interior.. LOL
Not that I ever really fell for the rich Corinthian leather story..it was pleather.. lol
Car Automotive parking light Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle
 

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I have a Ryobi BT3100 table saw I picked up off of Craigslist ten years ago. It is no cabinet saw but has performed well over the years.

I have no brand loyalty either. DeWalt, Milwaukee, Ridgid, Delta, Chicago electric, Wen. Generally, I gravitate to old arn for power tools.

Rob

Sent from my Pixel 4a using Tapatalk
 

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I own a couple Ryobi routers. One is mounted under a table and gets used frequently. I think I got it about ten years ago. Still working. The other is a plunge router that rarely gets used. I also have a Ryobi random orbital palm sander that got used a lot and kinda quit working. Doesn’t seem to random or orbit as much as it used to. For what I paid for them I think I got or am getting good use from them. I have other tools that are considered better brands and in the case of the sander the “better” brand does seem to perform better. It will take awhile to see if it lasts any longer.
 

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All my (very many) power tools are Ryobi 18V, and I like them all, except that I have Bosch for my corded Jobsite Table Saw, corded sliding Compound Miter Saw and 4" belt sander and Work Drive circular saw, and a Makita corded planer and a Makita circular saw (sidewinder type). The last was an impulse purchase via Nextdoor. For reciprocating saws, I have a Ryobi for convenience and a corded DeWalt for serious cutting. Oh, and a Bosch sabre saw.
 

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Thumb Nailer
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I have:

Biscuit Joiner
RO Sander
Corner Cat Sander
Handheld Planer
15 Amp 10” Tablesaw

I guess I have more than I realized. Haha. All of these work great. I try to steer clear of cordless in general except when it comes to drills. They seem like, unless a special situation, the best thing to have cordless.

I guess it just depends on what you are expecting out of the tool. If you expect say a Ryobi BT3100 table saw to perform like a 5HP cabinet saw, you WILL be sorely disappointed.

IF you understand what they are, and what they are good for you are fine.

There are some people, particularly on forums, that want to play the "mine is bigger than yours because I spent more" game. I see it with tools, as well as within other hobbies items...

As far as Ryobi goes I have...

Biscuit Joiner
Clutch driver / drill
biscuit joiner
buffer
corner cat sander
Random Orbital sander
Palm sander
13" planer, this could be better, but not at the price tags of "better". Snipe can be managed easily.
10" table saw (BT3100)

I typically toast a RO sander in around a year. The Ryobi has been with me for 3 years now and is chugging along fine. I have been through Skil, B&D, Makita, and now Ryobi. And YES I am VERY abusive to RO sanders. I like using the to smooth drywall repairs. Gypsum dust kills those things in a big old hurry.

Oh and to sum up my response to the OPs question. Why do some people hate Ryobi, and to expand that to Skil, Black and Decker, Chicago Electric, Craftsman whatever the brand is.

Elitism.

My d*ck is bigger than yoursism.

A lot of people seem to come up with their personal value by their possessions and want ot use the fact they can afford premium brands as a way to look down on other people.

There ARE legit reasons to own certain premium tools. Especially if you are making your living with those tools. HOWEVER the end result varies from tool to tool.

A good example of this effect is let's say you work 30 miles from home. You drive a 20 year old Chevy, and the guy in the parking space next to you at work drives a similar age Caddilac.and has a similar commute.

Did that Caddilac do a better job of transporting your colleague to work than your old Chevy?

Is that Caddilac going to be any more, or less reliable to get your colleague to and from work?

Was that Caddilac being a General Motors Product, really made by a different company / different workers using a different process than your Chevrolet, another General Motors product?

The difference is honestly the name brand on it, luxury features, fit and finish, and the branding / badging all over the thing.

A great Example from the tool world is 14" cast iron frame band saws.

Those are comparable to the Caddilac Cimmaron vs the Chevrolet Cavalier.
 

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I use Ryobi for lots of lawn tools. I just never used one for woodworking. Just a Dewalt and Bosch guy at heart.
 

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I started with Ryobi yard tools and the familiar 4-tool gift set, e.g., drill, circular saw, reciprocating saw, flashlight)... and so it began. I didn't really intend on becoming a "Ryobi guy", nor will I ever display my growing (just bought two more) arsenal of Ryobi 18v tools. But, I've only had ONE tool that kinda (okay, really did) suck. I just bought a 5" orbital sander and it was pathetic - I could stop it with my hand... without a glove. It was about 1/3 as effective as the old Ryobi "Mouse" sander I had. Good news - Home Depot customer service just throws it over their shoulder and refunds the money.

I'm just a DIY guy - I can't even count what I do as "wood working". It's more accurate to say I "occasionally make some stuff". For this, Ryobi is absolutely perfect!
 
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