Woodworking Talk banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm putting this miter saw back together and it seems like such a large machine should have a ground on the plug. Looking at all of my dewalt tools made me realize that none of them actually have ground pins in them.

Anyone know why?
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,644 Posts
I'm guessing

But with the advent of plastic housings around the motors rather than metal, there is little or no chance a shorted connection would become "live" and your body would then complete an electrical path to ground....resulting in severe shock or worse.

I prefer the old 3 pin plugs because no matter which way I attempt to plug in a 2 pin, it's wrong and I need to flip it around. The large lug is barely large enough to make a distinction for the proper orientation. :thumbdown: The ground pin assures it will only go in one way...DUH.
 
  • Like
Reactions: FirebirdHank

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Dewalt tools, even my table saw, are designed to be taken from job site to job site. some job sites might be older construction and not have a ground plug in the outlets. My conjecture is that this design makes them slightly more 'universal'.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29,448 Posts
I'm putting this miter saw back together and it seems like such a large machine should have a ground on the plug. Looking at all of my dewalt tools made me realize that none of them actually have ground pins in them.

Anyone know why?
A lot of tools don't. it's because the tools without ground plugs are double insulated eliminating the need for the ground.
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
A lot of tools don't. it's because the tools without ground plugs are double insulated eliminating the need for the ground.
Yes, and most plastic bodied tools are double insulated because of that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29,448 Posts
Yes, and most plastic bodied tools are double insulated because of that.
They kind of go overboard with that stuff, the ground and polarized plugs. If it was really that important they would make the ground plugs where ground prong wouldn't fall off. In almost 50 years I've only got a shock from a tool once. This one was an old circular saw which the whole body was aluminum.
 

· The Nut in the Cellar
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
They kind of go overboard with that stuff, the ground and polarized plugs. If it was really that important they would make the ground plugs where ground prong wouldn't fall off. In almost 50 years I've only got a shock from a tool once. This one was an old circular saw which the whole body was aluminum.
I have one of those. It was my Dad's and dates from the 1950s. It still runs, but is in dire need of brushes. Never used it, just keep it around as a keepsake. Notice how Dad delt with the lack of grounded outlets in our house back then. Ram Tool Co. appears to still be in business in Chicago and the Fury saw is listing on e-bay for $80. Probably didn't cost that much back in the '50s. Go figure.
Saw Automotive tire Gas Flooring Wood
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,644 Posts
Thread is dated 2014.
Reasons are still the same, Insulated housings made of plastic can't short to ground like the old aluminum ones.
Personally, I like 3 pronged ground plugs becise there's only ONE way they will fit in the cord or the outlet.
Not so with two prongs, where one is a tiny amount wider and they only will go in with the wide prong in the wider slot.
Try doing that in the dark.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
190 Posts
Many years back I had a warranty issue with a tool from sears, a drill if I remember correctly. At some point the cord had broken at the plug and I replaced it with a grounded piece. The guy at Sears said that you should never put a grounded plug on a double insulated tool. When I asked why he said "because the tool can't tell the difference".
 

· where's my table saw?
Joined
·
32,644 Posts
Many years back I had a warranty issue with a tool from sears, a drill if I remember correctly. At some point the cord had broken at the plug and I replaced it with a grounded piece. The guy at Sears said that you should never put a grounded plug on a double insulated tool. When I asked why he said "because the tool can't tell the difference".
How did you do that? Did the cord have the third wire?
That reply makes no sense in spite of being "cutsie".
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29,448 Posts
I have one of those. It was my Dad's and dates from the 1950s. It still runs, but is in dire need of brushes. Never used it, just keep it around as a keepsake. Notice how Dad delt with the lack of grounded outlets in our house back then. Ram Tool Co. appears to still be in business in Chicago and the Fury saw is listing on e-bay for $80. Probably didn't cost that much back in the '50s. Go figure.
View attachment 446960
I got one from my dad that was a lot newer. I think it was black and decker. It was hardly used but I got it out and it was so heavy I put it back in the box without using it. Then my son made comment he needed a circular saw so I gave it to him. It wasn't long before he brought it back.

I think it's been 43 years since I got shocked by the circular saw I was using. I think it was skill brand. Anyway the cabinet shop I worked for made vanity bases with a section at the top that protruded out a couple inches at the top. To make that they put a solid piece of ash across the front and to make drawer openings we cut the openings with a circular saw and a jig saw. After doing that for a couple hours my back got to talking to me and I reached over to the rail on a unisaw to stand up and got zapped. Got me hard enough I had to tell myself over and over to turn loose.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
6,885 Posts
Many years back I had a warranty issue with a tool from sears, a drill if I remember correctly. At some point the cord had broken at the plug and I replaced it with a grounded piece. The guy at Sears said that you should never put a grounded plug on a double insulated tool. When I asked why he said "because the tool can't tell the difference".
As I see it:

Double insulated tools are not to be used in hazardous conditions, and also must be labeled as Double Insulated, adding a grounded style plug even if third pin is not connected could lead to confusion.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I prefer the old 3 pin plugs because no matter which way I attempt to plug in a 2 pin, it's wrong and I need to flip it around. The large lug is barely large enough to make a distinction for the proper orientation. 👎 The ground pin assures it will only go in one way...DUH.
You have NO IDEA how glad I am to hear that I am not the only one.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top