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Cowboy up and do just it
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I've heard of cleaning and sharpening table saw blades but don't know where to send them to have it done. Any ideas and how much does it cost?

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I use Bull Sharpening mostly because they are a full service shop. For saw blades the cost varies by size and tooth count....I linked the price list. I intend to try an outfit called Dynamic saw, who has gotten rave reviews. I went with them because the local guys who do it are hacks who believe a blade should only be sharpened once, so they grind the teeth down to nothing.
 

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I have a local tool repair and sales place that offers sharpening services. I take my Freud blades to them and it costs me about $15 for a 50 tooth combination blade, less for a 24 tooth rip blade. Usuall able to get them sharpened 3-4 times before having to replace.
 

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I've heard of cleaning and sharpening table saw blades but don't know where to send them to have it done. Any ideas and how much does it cost?

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The guy I use charges 12 bucks for a 40 tooth blade - 14 for a 60 tooth blade - and 16 for a 80 tooth blade.

He is also a Freud authorized 'dealer' and when I call him to get NEW Freud blades - I have him 'sharpen' the NEW blades before bringing them to me... Why? Because he does it 'better' than Freud can... :yes:
 

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I have a local tool repair and sales place that offers sharpening services. I take my Freud blades to them and it costs me about $15 for a 50 tooth combination blade, less for a 24 tooth rip blade. Usuall able to get them sharpened 3-4 times before having to replace.

That does not sound like very many times to me...

How much are they taking off and how bad are the blades before sending them out??? :blink:




I get a LOT more sharpenings out of a blade before it gets taken out of service.

We had some that were taken out of service and 'designated' as 'garbage blades' because the carbide got so thin (blades to be used for cutting stuff we KNOW will ruin them...) Before someone 'lectures' me about this - READ the disclaimer below...

I am not suggesting that anyone else should cut stuff they are not 'supposed to' with 'garbage' blades. Just talking about what I use them for... I have NOT been injured yet doing this - But... I suppose tommorrow could be my 'lucky' day when a chunk of flying carbide ruins my afternoon... :blink:

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On a day that I was out on the jobsite - Someone 'else' gave my blade guy the WRONG stack of blades to do when he came by the shop and he 'did' them... They were the blades with the carbide that was too thin and deemed 'unserviceable' by another local blade sharpener in the past... :no:

The guy not only sharpened them - He sharpened the wizz out of them - (After the 'other' shop had said they were 'unserviceable'...) :yes: I will come back tomorrow and post some pics of the carbide on some blades we keep around for 'blade killing' work. They are sharp as all getout but not even my guy will attempt to sharpen these again. Not much left there to sharpen... I have no doubts that each one of these blades has seen more than 10 to 20 'sharpenings' in their lifetime... I KNOW because I am the guy that sends them out to be done. :yes:
 

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where's my table saw?
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depends on your blades

I've got used to the Freud Diablo, 24 T, 40T and 60T thin kerf. I've not had to sharpen any yet, but I realize there is not a lot of carbide on the teeth. My theory is, I'll sharpen them 1 or maybe 2 times, and since the price is around $30 - $40 it really doesn't pay to take any chances. If the sharpening price is $15 then if I add another $15 and I can have a new blade with no safety issues.
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=forrest saw blade&page=1&rh=n:328182011,k:forrest saw blade
I have some nice full kerf blades, a Forrest Woodworker 2, and some Deltas, Leitz, and other Freuds, but I don't have a 3 HP cabinet saw, only the Craftsman 12" motorized and a 10" Hybrid. So I like the thin kerf and they do all I need. I've found some great sales online and that's when I buy about 3 at a time for $25 a piece. I use the 10" blades on the 12" saw since it has a 5/8" arbor. I use The Cutting Edge sharpening service in Dryden, MI for those who may be local. Nice folks and they do a good job. :yes:
 

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I've got used to the Freud Diablo, 24 T, 40T and 60T thin kerf. I've not had to sharpen any yet, but I realize there is not a lot of carbide on the teeth. My theory is, I'll sharpen them 1 or maybe 2 times, and since the price is around $30 - $40 it really doesn't pay to take any chances.
Send me your CRAPPIEST blade and I will pay to have my guy sharpen it and send it back to you...

Measure your carbide thickness BEFORE you send it to me... And measure again after you get it back... :smile:

I will pay to have it sharpened and I will pay the shipping to send it back to you... :thumbsup:

All YOU need to do is post your measurements (before and after) and 'opinions' about the quality of the work done and I will be happy. :yes:

You should be able to safely get a LOT more than 2 sharpenings from any Freud blade if you are not breaking/chipping teeth or sending it to someone that hogs off too much carbide to do the job required... :yes:

Sending you a PM with my address now...
 

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where's my table saw?
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nice offer, thanks

I'll round up a blade and send it to you. I don't have any crappy blades, just used ones ...LOL.
 

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I don't think listing the types of blades I have matters with the service that does the sharpening. Sharpening should be done by a service more involved than a guy with a diamond file.

If there isn't a local shop for your blades you might be committed to mailing them out. If you are fortunate enough to have a local service, check with them if they have complete services, such as tip replacement, and truing.

A good shop will return a blade that is equivalent to a new one, and IMO, not a safety factor. I've had new blades that weren't flat, tips fly off, or out of set teeth.

The services I use are competent in carbide repair, router bits, shaper cutters, planer/jointer knives and bandsaw blades. They will provide a list of the charges, and comparing to the cost of new blades is worth every penny. What is important is to use a sharp and an appropriate blade for the task. Most services have a week or less turn around.







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Scott Whiting in Glensdale, AZ gets rave reviews, as does Dynamic Saw in Buffalo, NY. Ridge Carbide is another highly regarded option.
 

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You can do a honing job on positive hook blades your self, but it is tedious to do.

You need a extra fine diamond stone, and a sharpie marker.

You start by raising the blade all the way and then blackening the face of all the teeth with the sharpie.

The next step is to slide the diamond stone into a gullet, and then fine tune the tooth contact by lowering the blade until with the back of the diamond stone one the table, there is full contact with the tooth. Check this by sliding the stone across the tooth a few times and looking at the pattern left on the tooth. If the marker is off the front only, lower the blade a bit. If it is off the back only, raise it a bit. You want an even cut across the full face of the blade.

Once the height is set for full face contact, the tedious part of facing every tooth until the sharpie is gone begins. Just keep a bit of pressure on the stone by gently pushing the blade into it, and slide the stone back and forth until the sharpie is gone.

If the blade isn't too dull, it only takes a few strokes of the stone to hone each tooth.
 
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