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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All. Matt here, I'm new to the forum. I've got a guy from craigslist interested in buying standing white pines from me for a log home he wants to build. He would be supplying the lumberjack to do the cutting.

Can anyone give me either a ballpark figure on what to charge this guy for standing 16 to 22 inch straight white pine logs 50' in length or point me in the right direction? This guy needs about 200 of these logs for is home and garage. For reference, I live in Southern Michigan.

I'd appreciate any help or direction anyone can throw my way.

Thanks,
Matt
 

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The only thing I would suggest Doing is to call some of your local or non local log home builders and ask them what their prices are per log.
Some may not give you a quote on per log but they'll give you a quote on a log package.
Do you know the square footage of his structure he wants to build?
I have a friend that got logs from golden eagle log home and I believe he got them for like $375 per log.
Also depends on quality and if they are green or kiln dried.
No pro on this subject but that's what I can tell you. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks guys. I appreciate the direction. I will look into log home builders. There at least used to be quite a few in northern MI prior to the big downturn.

Daren, I visited the links (both to the thread and the MI DNR website) you left me and I found a list of Certified Forest Plan Writers for my county. Do you know if it is worthwhile to get a management plan written? Otherwise I could just see what they'd charge me to come out and cruise it.

Thanks,
Matt
 

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Matt, I would contact your Dept of Natural Resources, Forestry Division. They should be able to point you in the right direction. http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-30301-34287--,00.html

Not exactly your situation, but a discussion of why contacting a forester is a good idea when you have a http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f26/question-about-logging-35059/


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This is an excellent suggestion. Being contact with your Natural Resources people is something everyone growing timber should do.

George
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've got 19 acres, about 14 acres of which are white pines. There is an additional 2 acres of swamp white oaks, and another 3 acres worth of swampy potholes with big cottonwoods.

I did contact a forester from the list, he was very helpful and said that he could cruise the plot and write a stewardship plan for about $500 out of pocket from me. The state of MI apparently cost shares these things and would pick up the other $300 of his fee for that size plot.

He said that the stewardship plan would also let me apply for other state and federal grant monies for wildlife habitat improvement and things like buckthorn and other invasive species control. He said that he can also arrange for thinning, logging, etc.. to be done by honest loggers that he deals with.

Also told me NOT to have a logger come in and cut all the choice trees out right now, that it needs to be thinned and then logged in stages in the future with more diverse plantings in the cleared areas for future profits. He suggested black walnut and black cherry as they grow fast and would add value to the property. Sounds like good logic I suppose.

Another forester on the list wanted $1200 from me for the same thing. Quite a difference in price.

Haven't gotten the word on stumpage prices yet though.

Seemed like an honest guy. Does this sound like a good deal? Does anyone have any experiences with getting a management plan or a "stewardship" plan written for a forest?

thanks,
Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Stumpage report for White Pine says about $120 statewide average per MBF for saw logs and about $36 per MBF for pulp. Not sure what size a log needs to be in order to be considered a sawlog.
 

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Bunch of potential problems when you aren't familiar with who is doing the cutting, what will be cut, how careful the feller & skidder are with what is left, when the cutting is done (time of year) and what is left to grow for the next cutting. Big problem with "High Grading" is that it takes the best characteristics and leaves the culls. This means that, in the long run, those seed trees with the worst characteristics are left to repopulate the land. Much better to selective cut mature trees, and slowly open up the understory to promote growth in the next generation of the best that are growing. Picking and choosing involves more than just taking out the biggest, but also removing the culls, and mature trees that are inhibiting successional forest for 30 to 80 years in the future. Time of year might be critical, as compacting the soil will affect the growth of what is coming up. Better to cut and skid when the frost is in than in the spring. roots need to breathe. You will only get out what you are willing to put in to ensure your grandchildren will benefit. You might also consider what you want this property to be doing in 10, 30, 50 or even 100 years. Once it is cut, you can't go back and correct the errors.
 
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