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Discussion Starter #1
I have a piece of white ash that was killed by the emerald ash borer available to me. The piece is about 2-1/2' diameter by about 5' long and it is where 5 different branches come together. There are some darker rings among the light wood.

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jimskio
 

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My general answer would be yes but without seeing the log I can't really say. Also, it depends on how easy it is for you to mill (ie. do you have to transport it, do you have the equipment to move it, are you sawing it yourself?).

Geoff
 

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You have the ash borers in Savannah GA? They are rapidly spreading here in Illinois. Our ash trees are probably doomed. Gary
 

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Ash borers have been in Illinois/Michigan for a number of years now.
Awareness and treating the trees when found helps, but the ones out in the wild will have a hard time.
 

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We have those bugs in MN and WI too. Wish there was some native species to help fight them. Growing up we lost a lot of old and very large Elm trees to Dutch Elm disease. These trees were replaced with Ash trees and it looks like we are going to have a repeat scenario.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #6
No ash borers in Savannah that I know of. I am in Casco, Michigan at the moment. I think one of my girlfriends uncle's has a buddy with a bandsaw mill.

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jimskio
 

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most of the ash tree's in michigan have been wiped out, the ones that aren't dead yet are dieing. the larvae of the emerald ash borer lives between the bark and the wood in the cambium layer. the larvae feed on the cambium which is how the tree feeds itself and is basicly cut off of the ability to feed itself and dies. The larvae do not get into the lumber and it is usualy not damaged. If you mill this log, and I would, do not transport any boards with bark on them as you will spread the infestation to new areas. be sure to mill off all sapwood and bark. variations of the color of the wood are common from white to red in the same log, still beautiful especialy when flat sawn for cathiedral grain figure.
 

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I live very close to where the EAB was first discovered in WI. They recently released some wasp species that is a natural preditor of the the beetle. They say it will take several years to tell if it is working or not. In the mean time we are under quarantine which means we can't move natural edge ash boards or fire wood across county lines. If you can use it in the general vicinity of where you will be milling it I would say mill it with the natural edges on it if not check with the local policy and see if you are allowed to move the wood.
 

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here is a box I made out of white ash. The black lines might be spalt. Works nice and smells good. the top is white oak. It is a bummer that we are losing the trees. out west here it is the pine beetle-whole mountains are turning brown.
 

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