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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a question to all tool bofins out there.. I'm in possession of almost zero tools at the moment, apart from the basic hand tools, what would be my first power tool investment?

I've been contemplating the band saw for a few weeks now but not sure if its the one... In my opinion, if I had to get a radial arm saw and a scroll saw, the band saw would become obsolete? I don't know..

Currently I am in possession of: a hacksaw (yes, used it to make a jewelry box the other day), jigsaw cutter I bought today as well as an orbital sander.. I have cheap set of chisels I'm throwing out tomorrow as well as my bench plane which is also going.

It should be noted that I do intend to manufacture (in relatively high quantities) smaller items including boxes, chess boards, frames etc...

Any advice here would be more than welcome... :thumbsup:
 

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Welcome to the forum. A lot that will determine what you get is what are your plans to build? How much money do you plan on spending and how much will you use these tools? If you are a weekend warrior and do it once in awhile don't go and get the best money can buy. Some of the basics for a home shop, table saw, miter saw, circular saw. I don't have a band saw, I can do what I need with my jig saw for most projects. For cutting larger pieces of wood the table saw is the way to go. I don't have a radial arm or scroll saw either. Haven't found a need for them yet. You can get affordable table saws for around 100 bucks, they do the job and don't break the bank. I have been using my 100 table saw for 10 years and just replace the blades because I don't use them everyday. I recently built a new stand for mine to make it more versatile for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Will be used mostly for smaller items as I said, jewellry boxes, chess boards, picture frames and sort of thing.. But on more than just weekends, almost full time basis. As far as money goes, I'm not that incredibly shy on spending, I have a budget of around R12000, which in your terms is around $1100 or so.. I can obviously go slightly over if the need arises.

So yeah, basically I'm looking for the best starter equipment without going to overboard..
 

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I'm a big fan of radial arm saws, will never be without one again. Even so, regardless of what you do, a TS would be at the top of any list I was to compose. That said, it seems I read (or heard) somewhere that the band saw is considered the go-to tool in many European (maybe it was just the Brits?) shops.
 

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To be honest if you have a table saw and a miter saw. There is no real purpose to have a radial ARM saw. I mean a table saw can do everything it cam do more accurately. And the miter saw just for the conveince of crosscuts.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All signs then are really still pointing toward a bandsaw.. I suppose the option does still always exist to upgrade and purchase additional equipment as I see the need.

Right now all I really need is a tool to cut proper straight lines without the bevel you get from a jigsaw or hand saw. The right tool there I know would be the TS but I do still need to be able to do curved cuts as well.

The help has really been appreciated, but I think the band saw will still be my first purchase, then perhaps the radial arm later on..
 

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I'm a huge fan of the bandsaw to start out

It's pretty safe as far as kickback goes unlike the table saw. You must still be aware that the blade will cut flesh and bone as easily as wood however. Keep your fingers far away and never in direct line of the blade.

IF you get a decent saw, set it up properly, have a decent fence, you can cut straight edges pretty accurately. A 3/8" blade will make good straight cuts and a 1/4" blade will cut pretty tight curves.

IF you have a decent workbench AND vise you can plane the surfaces smooth with a decent handplane.

Two or three sharp chisels will get you through most projects. 1/4", 1/2" and 3/4" would be my choice.

I will admit that my 10" Craftsman table saw was my first stationary power tool, but my projects were basic rectangles, cabinets, from plywood and construction 1X and 2X material. Now with 50 more years experience, I would not hesitate to make some real nice boxes with the tools I just mentioned.

You will learn a lot more about the qualities of wood, if you get a hand plane and start flattening and straightening some rough sawn wood. That will teach you more about grains and grain directions than running it through the table saw. :yes:
 

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I think the most important machine in a shop is a table saw. Second would be a jointer. Third would be an air compressor and nail gun. Depending on the work you are doing a scroll saw or bandsaw would be handy. Myself I have two bandsaws but no scrollsaw.
 

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Get a project to make first. Then get the tools it'll take to make that project. I have a sawzall. I got it when I had a condemned deck to take apart. Every drill I have was an "I'm gonna need a better drill for this!" purchase. My new table saw was because that last project I had couldn't be done easily with my old table saw.
 

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Why are you tossing your chisels? I'm sure with a good sharpening they will work until a higher quality set can be bought. You can send them to me. I love free tools
 
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