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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Looking to buy nice screws for my wood bench project but curious how thread depth affects wood does anyone know from experience? Is tighter or wider thread depth less likely to cause splints or cracks? Any other tips on screws for a beginner? Thanks
 

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I use coarse thread for both hard and soft woods. I drill a countersunk/pilot hole. I like to use lengths that seat about two thirds in the second piece (like 1¼" for ¾" to ¾").






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Second that! Most importantly is to pilot drill & try to keep the hole away from end grain edge of wood to minimize splitting.
 
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Also try not to put two screws in the same grain. In other words offset the screws and predrill with a bit that's just a little smaller than the base of the screw. Another great tip is use High Performance Exterior Screws with the star drive tip. Trust me you'll go crazy driving cross tip screws, they slip. The star drive are a ton easier. Good luck.
 

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I use coarse thread for both hard and soft woods. I drill a countersunk/pilot hole. I like to use lengths that seat about two thirds in the second piece (like 1¼" for ¾" to ¾").






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Same here. My bit/countersink cuts nice enough that I can also take it all the way down to the flange with little to no force so I can use a 3/8" plug to hide the screws.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So how much different is a countersink or counterbore going to finish compared to a spade bit? I like the countersinks that don't have the long drill on it because you can't really pick the size of it. They tried to make it one step when really it should always be two.
 

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So how much different is a countersink or counterbore going to finish compared to a spade bit? I like the countersinks that don't have the long drill on it because you can't really pick the size of it. They tried to make it one step when really it should always be two.
You can buy the combo bits that will drill the countersink in different widths. The bits they come with are pretty much what is needed for that size screw.





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So how much different is a countersink or counterbore going to finish compared to a spade bit? I like the countersinks that don't have the long drill on it because you can't really pick the size of it. They tried to make it one step when really it should always be two.
One step is certainly better than two. As Cabinet man says below, get the proper bit and it works perfectly.

What would you do with a spade bit?

George
 

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So how much different is a countersink or counterbore going to finish compared to a spade bit? I like the countersinks that don't have the long drill on it because you can't really pick the size of it. They tried to make it one step when really it should always be two.
One like this can be adjusted to whatever length you want


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Echo'ing Hammer1 on the caution of using "cheap" drywall screws on anything remotely engineered.Heck,they're marginal for SR...duh.

Any flex within the pce will see them fail....may be sooner,may be later.Some would see this as overly complex(it's just a screw),and maybe it is?But do a set of deck stairs with some POS screw and get a dz folks on them,shakin their booty....that there would be flex.

Just remember....the more flex,designed/engineered into the project....the more critical the fastener.And there are charts for length's.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
so what is a cheap drywall screw and what's a high end drywall screw? I was thinking on using torx screws because they look better and would be easier to install with a hand ratchet.
 

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BobLongwood said:
so what is a cheap drywall screw and what's a high end drywall screw? I was thinking on using torx screws because they look better and would be easier to install with a hand ratchet.
I love those screws but I only use them for fixtures and jigs. I use the deck screw kind. But again only for fixtures.

Al

Nails only hold themselves.
 

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so what is a cheap drywall screw and what's a high end drywall screw? I was thinking on using torx screws because they look better and would be easier to install with a hand ratchet.
Coarse thread drywall screws work OK when they are installed correctly. Drill a piloted/countersunk hole, and drive the screw in slowly with a cordless drill. When near tight, just bump the trigger to tighten the screw. Screws snap, or the heads snap off from driving too fast, creating heat. When driven fast and then they seat, that's when they can snap.

There are drywall type screws, like #7's with larger diameter shanks. Their composites may differ, along with how brittle they may be.






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It's not "cheap" vs "expensive" drywall screws, somebody just injected their personal take. It's the type of steel used to make drywall screws, at any price. For structural assemblies that can be subjected to shear forces, you want a mild steel that can bend, not a hardened one which can break off. There are some folks who use drywall or drywall like screws because they are readily available and easy to drive with a drill. They may not realize the screws can fail catastrophically. One major issue is in the construction of scaffoldings on job sites. People have used such screws in this type of construction and been hurt seriously. The type of drive head has nothing to do with it. You can get structural grade screws in all different styles of drive heads.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It's not "cheap" vs "expensive" drywall screws, somebody just injected their personal take. It's the type of steel used to make drywall screws, at any price. For structural assemblies that can be subjected to shear forces, you want a mild steel that can bend, not a hardened one which can break off. There are some folks who use drywall or drywall like screws because they are readily available and easy to drive with a drill. They may not realize the screws can fail catastrophically. One major issue is in the construction of scaffoldings on job sites. People have used such screws in this type of construction and been hurt seriously. The type of drive head has nothing to do with it. You can get structural grade screws in all different styles of drive heads.
Thank you for clarifying. Is the type of steel usually disclosed on the product or is this info usually not given? Which types of steel or screw are usually a safe bet for mild steel and not hardened?
 
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