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Discussion Starter #1
To determine if the wood is to wet or too dry which moisture meter would you guys recommend? Is a Protimeter good or which brand is the best?
 

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A moisture meter is something you can spend hundreds of dollars on. Personally I don't think it's necessary to have that much accuracy unless you are running a mill and air or kiln drying lumber. I use a cheap one I got at Lowe's for thirty bucks. It's made by General Tool. I pretty much only use it when I'm air drying pressure treated wood.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oke thank you for the quick response, but do you think your meter is accurate compared to expensive ones? And which type exactly do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Does anyone else have a suggestion which moisture meters are good to buy, and should I get expensive or cheap ones ?
 

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Yes I have looked up in the web, and I also found an answer there. For example this page shows the best moisture meters for wood: https://bestmoisturemeters.com/moisture-meters/wood-moisture-meters/. But I wanted to know from people who really used it and who have more experience with a moisture meter. And there is no better place then to do that on a wood forum in my opinion. That is why I ask different people what they think and about their preferences.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I will look trough the reviews on amazon to see what the conclusion is. Thank you for your help! I will let you know if I found my solution.
 

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Oke the meter has a nice overall review indeed. And what is your opinion on pin vs pinless moisture meters. Which is more accurate?
I've never used a pinless. Everything I've read people say the pin type is more accurate. For this reason and price I bought the one I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hmm ok. That is the same that I can find, most of the people say that a pin moisture meter is much more accurate, I think I am going to take one of those. Atleast not a pinless.
 

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I'm sure the meter isn't near as accurate as one that cost hundreds of dollars but I think it's accurate enough to tell if the wood is usable or not.

This is the meter I am using. https://www.lowes.com/pd/General-Tools-Instruments-Digital-Moisture-Meter/3136919
Steve:

Thanks for posting that link. I think I will have to pick one up.

I have a Lignomat Mini-Ligno E. I purchased it probably 20 years ago. It works well. The only complaint I have is that I have broken the switch twice. I have been able to fix it, but I would like to have a back up moisture meter. I start most of my projects from lumber that I have harvested, sawed, air-dryed, jointed and planed. I use my moisture meter a lot.

A replacement Mini-Ligno is about $150, so for $30 the General sounds like a good one to try. I didn't see any case included. Have you found a case you like for your General?

Eric
 

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Steve:

Thanks for posting that link. I think I will have to pick one up.

I have a Lignomat Mini-Ligno E. I purchased it probably 20 years ago. It works well. The only complaint I have is that I have broken the switch twice. I have been able to fix it, but I would like to have a back up moisture meter. I start most of my projects from lumber that I have harvested, sawed, air-dryed, jointed and planed. I use my moisture meter a lot.

A replacement Mini-Ligno is about $150, so for $30 the General sounds like a good one to try. I didn't see any case included. Have you found a case you like for your General?

Eric
I've never attempted to find a case for my meter. I just keep mine in a drawer when not in use. If I took it with me to other locations I would probably just get a very small tool box and cut a piece of rigid foam and cut it to fit meter.
 

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I just looked on Amazon in the US and found several moisture meters for under $20. I wonder if most of the cheap ones have the same electronics on the inside, but with each manufacturer's own external packaging and button layout. I note that many of them have the same three buttons - On/Off, Mode, and Hold.
 

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I just looked on Amazon in the US and found several moisture meters for under $20. I wonder if most of the cheap ones have the same electronics on the inside, but with each manufacturer's own external packaging and button layout. I note that many of them have the same three buttons - On/Off, Mode, and Hold.
Your "wondering" sounds like reality to me. "Copy-catting" is a process that is way too popular in the world of woodworking. Someone once told me that it was "re-inventing the wheel with marketing spin", oh wait a minute, that was me that said that.:vs_laugh:

Eric
 

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Your "wondering" sounds like reality to me. "Copy-catting" is a process that is way too popular in the world of woodworking. Someone once told me that it was "re-inventing the wheel with marketing spin", oh wait a minute, that was me that said that.:vs_laugh:

Eric
I see it a lot. A company develops a ready-to-go chipset, along with the software, and a "reference build" that can be modified or copied. Then the consumer-level manufacturer buys them from the source and "wraps" them in their own plastic shell and adds buttons, and you see many manufacturers producing what is in effect the same thing, but with different cases.

It seems to be true for those laser distance meters (rangefinders), too. There are many different manufacturers, all at a similar low price point. I am convinced that they all have the same chip sets and software, but I have no evidence other than what I can see for myself. There are many other examples I can provide.
 

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I'm sure the meter isn't near as accurate as one that cost hundreds of dollars but I think it's accurate enough to tell if the wood is usable or not.

This is the meter I am using. https://www.lowes.com/pd/General-Tools-Instruments-Digital-Moisture-Meter/3136919
Thanks for the information. I purchased the General Tools & Instruments Digital Moisture Meter MMD4E this morning at Lowe's for $30. I started using using it in my shop this afternoon. The MMD4E works even better than my $150 Lignomat Mini-Ligno E. The case is alot sturdier and the accuracy matched the Lignomat. The instructions are well written and easy to understand. The best part is that the buttons are much more forgiving than the Lignomat, so hopefully, I won't be breaking them. Maybe the MMD4E will be my last moisture meter...if not for $30, I can buy five (5) of them for the price of my Lignomat...

I love it when new technology actually is less expensive and exceeds my expectations.

Eric
 
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