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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a small Walnut wall piece I made that has a Danish oil finish on it. I would like to add a small strip of walnut to it. Is there a glue that will hold over the oil finish, or will I just have to settle for screws from the rear?
 

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puffessional Scrabbleist
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solvent

I've done this several times, the most memorable being a piece of mahogany that had been done with tung oil. My method appears to work but I can't vouch for long term. Time will tell.

I used acetone to remove the oil and then sanded lightly before gluing things up. Rubbing the acetone back and forth across the spot with a cotton piece will draw the oil out after it softens. You won't get it all but enough to glue up with good wood glue. (Titebond II)

I'm sure someone will have an alternative method. I'd be interested in another way to attack this myself. Acetone is nasty stuff. (better than MEK)
TonyM
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've done this several times, the most memorable being a piece of mahogany that had been done with tung oil. My method appears to work but I can't vouch for long term. Time will tell.

I used acetone to remove the oil and then sanded lightly before gluing things up. Rubbing the acetone back and forth across the spot with a cotton piece will draw the oil out after it softens. You won't get it all but enough to glue up with good wood glue. (Titebond II)

I'm sure someone will have an alternative method. I'd be interested in another way to attack this myself. Acetone is nasty stuff. (better than MEK)
TonyM
Thanks for the idea. I have messed with Acetone and MEK before, on non woodworking projects and yes it's some nasty stuff. I think I am going to try this on a few spots as well as running in a couple screws from the rear. This piece will not support any real weight, so it should be fine.
 

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>>>> Acetone and MEK before, on non woodworking projects and yes it's some nasty stuff.

I wouldn't consider either acetone or MEK as "nasty stuff". They are both relative mild as chemicals go. Both are soluble in water. Acetone is the chemical sold as nail polish remover.

That said, I wouldn't use it in my martini.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
>>>> Acetone and MEK before, on non woodworking projects and yes it's some nasty stuff.

I wouldn't consider either acetone or MEK as "nasty stuff". They are both relative mild as chemicals go. Both are soluble in water. Acetone is the chemical sold as nail polish remover.

That said, I wouldn't use it in my martini.
For a household chemical they are fairly nasty, if not used properly. Acetone will destroy plastic, it's what I used to use on the ferrules of my golf clubs, when I re-shafted something. MEK works well for cleaning tools used with Epoxy.
 

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Old School
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For a household chemical they are fairly nasty, if not used properly. Acetone will destroy plastic, it's what I used to use on the ferrules of my golf clubs, when I re-shafted something. MEK works well for cleaning tools used with Epoxy.
+1. :yes: I agree. For household chemicals and for use in your shop, I consider them "nasty". Depending on the extent and type of exposure they can be the cause of a variety of problems. Respiratory problems is usually among the first, and it can go to skin, eye, and nasal irritations. Severe cases can lead to COPD and nerve damage. Like I said, it depends on the extent of exposure, and that applies to any solvent. They can get into the bloodstream just from contact with the skin.

For the occasional use of a hobbyist, I would suggest to have adequate ventilation and use the solvents as directed on their labels. If you notice they have a skull and crossbones on the container somewhere.






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puffessional Scrabbleist
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acetone

I'm glad others have the same idea. Acetone isn't a chemical to mess around with. It's flammability is extreme and the fumes can ignite via propane pilot lights. The worst trait is the ability to destroy a lot of things, corneas being atop the list. It definitely is worth handling with caution. It evaporates quickly but just a second can destroy a plastic product.

TonyM
 
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