Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need to buy a compound miter saw. Many models are available and I'd like to know what I can do without to save some $$.

I'm a weekend woodworker - bookshelves, storage chests, laundry shoot, etc.

So, options are 8.5 10 or 12 inch blades, single or double bevels. I will get a sliding model so I can cut larger pieces. But what about the blade size and single or double bevel?

I have a very nice table saw.

Thanks
 

·
woodbutcherer
Joined
·
610 Posts
You really should go to a tool store and play with a few to see which one best fits your needs. I would tell you to get the one like I have because it is the best (Makita-LS1016L). Makita makes a 12 inch version that has a 15 inch crosscut capacity also (Makita-LS1216L. Other people like the dewalts which I do not like because I cut most of my lumber in a chop motion (back to front) to keep the top of the wood from fraying and the dewalt frays close to the fence due to how far forward the blade is positioned. Bosch has a new concept out that has an articulated are instead of the slides (Bosch-GCM12SD). This would be great for space savings.
Ten inch should be good for your needs as most are designed to cut taller base and crown than even 5 years ago. There are cheaper options too, but it always seems you sacrifice cut quality for the lower price.
 

·
RAM Man
Joined
·
742 Posts
If accuracy is important to you then stay away from the bargain basement sliders like the Harbor Freight type under $200 saws. Many of the 10" sliders have almost as much cutting capacity as the 12"ers and blade defection isn't an issue with the 10"ers either so I'd recommend that route. Saws like the Makita LS1016 and LS1013 consistently receive high marks from their owners as do the DeWalt's. Other brands that seem to receive positive reviews are Bosch and Hitachi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,531 Posts
About 4 or 5 years ago I purchased a Craftsman 10" sliding, single compound saw. It works just fine for everything I have used it for. So far it has been used for the complete renovation of a condo and my house without any problems. This includes crown molding. You can get by with the single sided compound by turning the molding over for some of the cuts. The saw normally sells for about $250.

Geo
 

·
woodbutcherer
Joined
·
610 Posts
Ok, I would be kicking myself. Justifies my point that you need to "feel them up" in person and get the one that best fits your needs, not someone else's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for all the advice. I'll look at Makita and Dewalt ten inch double bevel sliding saws at Lowes and Home Depot and get what feels good for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I started working at a cabinet shop 12 years ago. When I first started I would get the charts out and set up the bevel and miter to do compound miter cuts for crown and such.

So when we got a dual bevel saw, I was all sorts of excited. But over time, I started using the bevel settings less and less.

Crown in particular is much easier to get accurate results by just using the miter and holding the crown at the same angle it will be installed at (either 30 or 45 degrees).

My point is, I don't think double bevel is really necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Well I ended up with a Dewalt 10 inch double bevel at a good price of $449, free shipping.

I liked the feel of it at Lowes.

Since the most expensive Dewalt is $700, I'm very happy with my choice.

Thanks everyone
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top