Woodworking Talk banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to make a basic/inexpensive homemade table saw. Nothing fancy. Really, I'm more concerned about cutting planks of wood, beams, than sheet.

My saw will have a top 4' x 2'. Okay, I'm cutting some wood lengths 7' long, along their length. I'll feed wood towards the blade from a 2' long edge side.

Just looking at the top (which is 18mm thick MDF by the way) I think that the blade should be towards the feed side, say 18" from the front edge to the blade spindle. And the blade 10" from and parallel with the (4' long) right hand edge.

I will likely put a roller bar just after the blade, in contact with the top of the wood. That will stop the wood tipping when there is more wood overhanging the top, than is in contact with it, after it has been cut.

Any thought? Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Hi. I could probably put the roller bar (to stop wood tipping) right in the middle, about 2' from a short edge. And the blade parallel to the right edge, 12" to 15" away. I could place spindle about 20" away from front edge.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/richards_internet/TEMPORARY/tablesaw.html

That motor needs better securing. The metal parts need to be prevented from twisting as the blade cuts.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
From the wood feeding side, which direction should the blade be travelling? Into the table, or away from it?
I must say I don't like your set up at all. It looks like a tragedy waiting to happen. But, since you asked...as you face the blade, it should be spinning towards you.






.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
If you are planning to screw a skillsaw (circular saw) to the underside of your board - Plan to be using your air compressor to blow it out OFTEN - Especially the trigger part...

Those things were not really designed to run upsidedown like that as far as the dust building up in the wrong places is concerned...

It WILL work though! :yes:

And MDF would NOT have been my first pick for a top... I would have used melamine because it tends to stay 'smoother' for 'longer' and LOTS of screws holding the saw to the underside. (bolts would be better so long as you countersank the tops so they were not in the way)

Good luck and post pics of your setup when done! :thumbsup:

ETA - Saw your picture... You need to do a better job of preventing that from moving around in MY opinion...
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,735 Posts
doesn't look safe to me

Hi. I could probably put the roller bar (to stop wood tipping) right in the middle, about 2' from a short edge. And the blade parallel to the right edge, 12" to 15" away. I could place spindle about 20" away from front edge.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/richards_internet/TEMPORARY/tablesaw.html

That motor needs better securing.
The metal parts need to be prevented from twisting as the blade cuts.

The motor was originally secured right behind the blade... I think?
That gives more leverage close in. The mount you have will allow ANY slight movement to be increased by the distance from the blade. It will not stay put in my opinion. I would reexamine the motor housing near the blade and see if there is any way to secure a plate onto what you have. You obviously cannot block the cooling vents.
I think you are "playing with fire here"... so far.
 

·
Sawdust Creator
Joined
·
8,046 Posts
I would recommend the blade be placed on a shelf,,,,never to see the motor shaft again. You can get decent used table saws on Craigslist for dirt cheap....why risk it with a potentially lethal endeavor?
 

·
where's my table saw?
Joined
·
28,735 Posts
Hah hah

I would recommend the blade be placed on a shelf,,,,never to see the motor shaft again. You can get decent used table saws on Craigslist for dirt cheap....why risk it with a potentially lethal endeavor?
The reason you can't have the motor move, even a little is that it will shift the blade and result in a kickback .... a serious injury.:yes:
It may not be the blade that hurts you, but depending on where your hands are, it may.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
I would recommend the blade be placed on a shelf,,,,never to see the motor shaft again. You can get decent used table saws on Craigslist for dirt cheap....why risk it with a potentially lethal endeavor?
+1. but then we'll miss out on another "don't let this TS accident happen top you" thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,651 Posts
+1. but then we'll miss out on another "don't let this TS accident happen top you" thread.
And Sawstop will miss out on another example as to why we all should buy their saw. You can buy a used table saw on craigslist cheap.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
7,222 Posts
I would recommend the blade be placed on a shelf,,,,never to see the motor shaft again. You can get decent used table saws on Craigslist for dirt cheap....why risk it with a potentially lethal endeavor?
I also shudder at the thought of this design. I for one would not want to use the machine.

The original poster is in the UK. Very different market than the US. Not as many tools available new or used. Many different regulations on the new tools compared to the US.
 

·
Old School
Joined
·
24,017 Posts
I also shudder at the thought of this design. I for one would not want to use the machine.

The original poster is in the UK. Very different market than the US. Not as many tools available new or used. Many different regulations on the new tools compared to the US.
Common sense is universal.







.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Forces

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/richards_internet/TEMPORARY/tablesaw.html

What do you think about my comments?

"This motor is from a circular saw. Obviously the motor had a metal shroud that half covered the blade. The items of interest is the "end plate" you see in the photograph which had the metal shroud, and the plastic body. The rotor turns, the stator stays put.

Points:

* When it was a circular saw, the work is againt the metal part, and it wants to move in the direction of the blade the direction of the rotor.

* There is a counter force in the opposite direction occuring inside the motor. The stator wants to go in the opposite direction to the rotor. The stator is somehow connected to the metal faceplate.

* In the circular saw the motor was not mounted. The design is capable safely cutting wood - if the work is (or effectively is) firmly against the metal part. There must be little if any movement between the work and the metal part.

* If this motor is to be part of a table saw, it is best that the "table" (of metal) is securely affixed to this structure. The rest of the table is an extention of the main table, the table that takes forces. It is also of importance that this structure does not move in relation to the "wider" table."

What I'm saying is that it's not so much the arrangement involved in affixing the motor to the bottom board, it's the metal plate (the "main" table) around the saw blade that is critical. And that is secure in relation to the metal end plate.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top