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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of making new bookshelves for my study as my daughter has learned how to take all my books off the open shelving. I wanted to use glass/acrylic panels so i can still see the books, but keep the doors closed to keep her out. i've been to HD and Lowes, but the acrylic panels they have are pretty flimsy. i'm looking for panels about 14 inx 36 in, so the panels they carry are too thin. I ideally would like acrylic or frosted acrylic (less likely for her to break).

Any ideas where i can get them or other alternatives for a transparent/translucent panel?
 

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Old School
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WELCOME TO THE FORUM

You didn't say in your post where in the world you are, and it's not in your profile.

You could look in your local Yellow Pages under "Plastics, Sheets", or "Acrylics/Sheets". Or call a local glass shop and they may direct you.

Or you can "Google" brand names like:
Plexiglas
Lucite
Acrylite
Perspex
Polycast

Or "Google" "Acrylic Sheet". Suppliers may have an online option for a supplier near you, where ever that is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input.

i haven't integrated glass/ acrylic into my projects before. 1/2 sounds pretty thick. If I use acrylic, what is the maximum span? I can make the panels smaller since i'd much rather use acrylic. i'm really afraid of my daughter breaking the glass.

i'm in Houston, TX.
 

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Old School
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Thanks for the input.

i haven't integrated glass/ acrylic into my projects before. 1/2 sounds pretty thick. If I use acrylic, what is the maximum span? I can make the panels smaller since i'd much rather use acrylic. i'm really afraid of my daughter breaking the glass.

i'm in Houston, TX.

If the panel is well secured, 1/4" should be sufficient and plenty rigid. Ask for cast acrylic sheet, not extruded
 

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Use tempered double strength glass. If she does bust it, she shouldn't get hurt. Regular glass, and most of the plastics, will leave jagged edges. Although busting the plastic would be a chore.

Any glass shop should have it for a couple of bucks a square foot. Just make sure your measurements are spot-on because you can't cut tempered.
 

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Tempered glass is not "double strenght" for a given thickness, it has just been heat treated to build internal tension to insure that it breaks into tiny Pcs if it breaks at all. (think broken car window as opposed to horror film shards) You have to order glass and get it cut, then have it tempered. If it were my daughter I'd go with the plastic because it won't shatter at all. I've used Acrylite on may occasions with good results. It cuts with most woodworking tools (feed fast to avoid re-melting and re-forming behind the blade) and stays clear over time. 1/4 inch material should be plenty thick unless you daughter plays for the Packers. If you order it frosted you won't really see the books.
 

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When you order glass for doors and such you specify either single-strength, which is 3/32" or double-strength which is 1/8".
 

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Old School
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A small detail about "tempered glass". It should be ordered from the facility that does the "tempering/annealing", as there is a shrinkage factor in the process. They would take the size you order and plug the data into their process, including any edgework, so the glass will finish the size you want. IOW, if you take them a piece of glass and ask for "tempering", it will come out smaller in size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the great input! i think i'm going to stick with the acrylic. I like being able to cut it to size myself, since my door frames sometimes don't come out the exact size i expect them to or i make some adjustments mid-build. I know a good glass place in town, and i'll check if i they carry acrylic or know somewhere that does.

Happy Thanksgiving.
 

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When you order glass for doors and such you specify either single-strength, which is 3/32" or double-strength which is 1/8".
As I said... for a given thickness. You just said "double strength" w/o saying anything about it being thicker. Now your post makes sense.
I'd be curious as to whether the addition of 1/32 would actually double the strength of the glass. It seems counterintuitive and such. If I ordered "double strength glass" from my glass guy he'd just scratch his head and ask me for the formula. (so he could burn it...he makes alot of money on the breakage of of regular strenght glass!) Here when we specify we get specific about the thickness of the product... "and such".
 

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Thanks for the great input! i think i'm going to stick with the acrylic. I like being able to cut it to size myself, since my door frames sometimes don't come out the exact size i expect them to or i make some adjustments mid-build. I know a good glass place in town, and i'll check if i they carry acrylic or know somewhere that does.

Happy Thanksgiving.
Would it be possible to add mullions to the doors so you could use two or three smaller pieces of acrylic so they would be stronger?:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I prefer the look of a single panel for the cabinet doors. Cabinetman mentioned "cast acrylic sheet" vs. "extruded". What is the difference?

Thanks.
 

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jkh; Acrylic is the way to go. It will not be cheap but I use in in offices, cause it does not break. 1/4" will stop a .22 cal bullet! So dont arm your daughter with a higher caliber LOL LOL.
 

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Old School
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I prefer the look of a single panel for the cabinet doors. Cabinetman mentioned "cast acrylic sheet" vs. "extruded". What is the difference?

Thanks.

I could give you the brief differences, like cast is just better, but since you are an inquiring kind of guy you can read the differences here.
 
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