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Discussion Starter #21
Thanks Sonny, I changed my order to this:


But they only had one in stock so I also got one of these:

 

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Discussion Starter #22
Day 2:

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Except that we moved that middle horizontal support down lower. Tomorrow we'll make couch section #2, probably just duplicating this one. When done it'll go in the corner to the right of this couch.

Now back to painting that horrible dusty wall.
 

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Ugh, not quite!! The centers of your seat frame need lateral support. At the 24 second mark in the video, he has 45° braces front and back centers. In your pic yesterday, I wasn't sure you had them as per your front-on view. Without them, your front and back deck boards will bow inward. Your braces could meet in the middle (at the bottom), pushing against one another. Otherwise, looking good.

Sonny
 

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Good work going on! I also suggest using thick polyester fiber quilt batting to wrap your foam--it will make it softer feeling, cushier and protect the foam. Any of the bigger fabric stores, Walmart or quilt shops will carry it, or order it online.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Thanks for that, will brace the cross members with 45's tomorrow. And thanks for the tip on batting.

I'm a bit worried our backrest is too bolt upright. But then again I'm testing it without webbing. It's a tall backrest so the uprightness is noticeable. Not an issue with the couch made in that video since his backrest is so short:

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A few more pics from today, day 3:

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4 inch foam on the seat, 3 inch foam on the back. No webbing yet and sitting on top of 2x3's:

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And as I type:

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I got the non stretching webbing today, but looks like won't have the stretchy stuff till Monday.

Any thoughts on whether that backrest should have an angle? If we need to move the bottom of the backrest 6" or so forward, we could conceivably add a little extension to the seat.

I'm thinking about using some temporary upholstery, like old bedsheets, so we can live with it a little and make any mods before adding the permanent fabric.
 

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Front porch wooden rockers have a seat about 19" deep; porch/patio swings have a seat about 20"-21" deep; Arm chairs, sofas etc. have a seat about 21"-22" deep.

For most all seating, optimum backrest angle is 7°. A porch wooden rocker may have a seat-to-backrest angle of 90°, but the recline, as a result of the rocker tilt at rest, is about 7°.

You can add a formed piece of wood to the front edge of you backrest "styles" for the appropriate angle. Apply (glue & tack) a 1/4" panel/ply on the whole side to further secure the extension to the present structure/"style".

*Notes about those wooden rockers: Back leg lengths need to be equal. Front leg lengths need to be equal. Rockers' angle front to back (Toe out or heel in) both left and right rocker angles needs to be the same. If leg lengths and angles are not symmetrical, the rocker may "walk" or creep sideways when in use. With all symmetrical a walking/creeping rocker may be the result of the pile on carpet. Some carpet piles will cause rockers to walk.

Your foam thickness is correct as per seat 4", backrest 3", generally. I kinna wondered about the density, 1.8. That's kind of firm, but should be long lasting. Use to be, Pink foam for seat, blue foam for backrest. Many folks today are switching to Super Lux Plush foam for both. Very comfortable for both applications. I noticed on your link to your foam there was no mention of fire resistance or fire retardant. Most all foams made today are fire resistant/retardant. In some case, especially for commercial use, fire resistant/retardant is required by code.

Quilt batting is for quilts. It's kinna compact, flattened you might say. Polyester "fiberfill" batting for furniture is usually thicker (1"), but it is fluffed up you might say, not compacted. That's what makes it a softer feel. But it doesn't matter which batting you use. Both accomplish the function desired. With a fiber lining, your fabric will flow much better during application. Often times fabric will kind of "stick" to the foam, when applying directly onto foam. The fabric doesn't slide over the foam smoothly when applying. The batting helps with fabric application that way.

You mentioned applying an old sheet for temporary covering, upholstering. Well, it's not uncommon to apply a liner to some applications, before applying your fabric. Like the fiberfill batting, a liner helps with fabric application, allows the fabric to flow easier over the surfaces being covered. One very good reason to use a liner - You practice your fitting for your fabric. Make your cutting mistakes on your liner, then correct the mistakes with your fabric. Apply your liner, check the fit, remove the liner and use it as a pattern for your fabric. Reapply the liner when you're comfortable with your fabric layout/cutout. A thin muslin fabric is usually pretty cheap, $1 a yard. I buy it by the bolt specifically for lining. If you have a local remnant fabric store 9discontinued fabric), you might find lots of inexpensive or discounted fabrics there. Remnant fabrics are discontinued patterns, schemes and the like. Still good fabric, just make sure you get enough because you can't order more... it's discontinued!!! That's why it's "remnant". Remnant stores usually have muslin, curtain fabrics, trim, buttons.... the whole gauntlet of sewing oddities and needs at reduced prices.

I had mentioned railraoded fabric before. When selecting fabric, don't consider just a pattern for the railroading. If it is a plain fabric, no pattern, double check that if it has a pile. If applicable, you want the pile to be oriented in the railraoded configuration, along the bolt, not up the bolt. Usually this is a consideration for a velvet or a velour type fabric. Your area/room seems to be a man cave or the like, so I'd suspect you won't be getting a velvet or velour fabric, but thought I'd mention the pile issue, anyway. You not painting those walls pink, right?

If your fabric has a pattern or pile, which way is up for the application on your sofa? Keep all your panels (pattern/pile) running it the same direction. You want a pile to face/lay in the downward direction on the backrest and similar panels. On the seat, you want the pile to face/lay forward, toward the front of the sofa.

From what I can see, you're coming along just fine. The little nuance "mistakes" or anomalies aren't severe and easily remedied. Remain confident, it'll turn out ok.

Sonny
 

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One other thing I've noticed, with you sitting on the foam. Your feet are on the floor. I suppose you won't be installing any significant feet onto your sofa. Adding feet will raise your seating.... feet off the floor? I don't think you will want your feet off the floor when sitting. However, the boards under the foam are firm, not allowing any depression. Once your webbing is installed, then your seat will depress to a lower position. Applying feet may end up being a comforting, more appropriate seat height.

Just an observation as your pics show.... little things to consider and easily remedied.

Sonny
 

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The 3" foam, to be curved over the top of the backrest. You might/probably will need to cut a "V", out, on the underside of the foam, to allow for the bending of the foam. Cut the "V" only about 1.5" deep, test the curve/fit. Cut a tad deeper or cut a wider "V" if need be, test the fit.....repeat?

Sonny
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thanks. I'm wondering if I should get less dense foam?

Also, I'm really worried about the backrest angle. Looking at another video there's a very obvious backrest angle:

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Is that about the angle we should go for? And should we do that with webbing or hard back?
 

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Back angle is for confort...
 

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Modify your framing, not the webbing/padding, for a backrest angle.

Wait until you apply your seat webbing, then check the foam/depression comfort. The flex of the webbing will help counter the foam firmness, if the foam felt too firm in your previous sit-test. Those boards foundation didn't give you an accurate feel as to how "soft" your seating will be.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Doing the webbing now. Any thoughts on how tight to do the elastic webbing? I'm applying it first, and stretching it about as tight as I can. Is that right?
 

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Good and snug but not super tight, not as tight as you can. View the video guy as to his testing of the depression. Use your judgement. Snug all the strands the same, as best you can "feel". Once you've installed all the front-to-back strands, test the depression of the first strand compared to the last strand. Make sure the tension is relatively the same and all across the span. Sometimes as you work across, you have a tendency to either tighten more, as you go, OR tighten less. Take care to be consistent.

Sonny
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Thanks for that. And looks like our cross brace (with the 45 degree angles) wasn't strong enough, the whole side started to bow. Let's try that again!
 

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You may be tightening the strands too much. But if only your strand tension was pulling your edges inward, your subsequent sitting would have added more to that force. Shore up your bracing, even if you have to over construct your counter force support - long transverse support (right to left) and short transverse support (front to back) on the same plane.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Webbing day!

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The red stripe webbing is elastic and a bit stiffer than the green, so we used the green on the backrest. The black webbing is non-elastic (the "secondary"), and I may have made that a bit too tight, I get a little bit of a feeling of a wedgie when I sit on it. Or I might just be over thinking it. But I may redo the secondary tomorrow.

And there's an elastic band under each non elastic band. We ran out of elastic webbing, more arrives tomorrow and I'll add two more left/right elastic supports.

The bowing issue is no joke! Here's a pic right after we started applying the webbing:

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That's not a fisheye lens, the wood is bending. If you look closely you can see the 1x3 base of the 45 degree angle supports is bending. Ugh! I removed all the webbing after that pic and we rebuilt it with 2x3's and reinforced everything and I put the webbing on a bit looser and I think it's a lot better now. Tomorrow we'll reinforce the frame even more. Thankfully the frame doesn't have to be pretty.

And I hope the elastic webbing isn't still too tight. It seems really comfortable to sit on now, especially before I added the secondary. But it's clearly stressing the frame. I'll post better pics of the naked frame in the morning.

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very nicely done so far !!
I don't know if it is an optical illusion or the seat is actually drawn in by the webbing on a frame with not enough lateral supports. (cross members).

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