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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need to try and make these boards flush with strapping. Super new tool user but would like to get the best tool for the job. Thanks!




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Do a Intro in the Intro area an Welcome Aboard, what tools are available to you. A Flush cut hand saw will work an there are other tools to
 
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I'd probably use a router and a bottom bearing flush cut bit, but that's just cause I have a good one. A good router powerful enough to perform that operation well would be somewhat pricey.

To do the same job without spending a bunch of money, a $20 flush cut or pull saw from Home Depot would work, but will require some patience & elbow grease, and a bit of technique.
 

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A hand held circular saw set to depth , cutting along a drawn line will do it .
A mask and goggles are advisable.
That is what I would do as well. Or a hand saw. This is obviously a deck and not fine woodworking, so in my opinion a router seems out of place.
 

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Manuka Jock said:
A hand held circular saw set to depth , cutting along a drawn line will do it .
A mask and goggles are advisable.
I think I would go this way due to the soft end grain and the router bit might just chew up the ends.

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
bigcouger said:
Do a Intro in the Intro area an Welcome Aboard, what tools are available to you. A Flush cut hand saw will work an there are other tools to
Thanks. Just did the intro. Right now just have circ saw, oscillating sander, fein tool and rough hand saw. Would hand planer have a chance to work?
 

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Thanks. Just did the intro. Right now just have circ saw, oscillating sander, fein tool and rough hand saw. Would hand planer have a chance to work?
A hand plane could work but not the most efficient method. If I were to chose a hand tool it would have been a saw BEFORE the boards were hung - otherwise still a saw after the fact.

The biggest problem you would have with a hand saw will be keeping it from riding up as no all of the boards extend above the rail.
 

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I'm for the circular saw and I would fasten a straight edge either on the inside or outside of the rail. That would insure a nice neat cut.
 

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:smile:A new tape measure?:smile: or if you want the straightedge and skill saw, you could even put a slight angle / on it.
 

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What do you need to do the work?
1) A better tape measure
2) A steadier hand at cutting
3) A method to double-check your work
4) An electric planer with a lot of blades
 

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dlb said:
What do you need to do the work?
1) A better tape measure
2) A steadier hand at cutting
3) A method to double-check your work
4) An electric planer with a lot of blades
Don't you think that's a bit rude and elitist? He said he's a new tool user. As in not experienced. Don't be a jerk.
 

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Don't you think that's a bit rude and elitist? He said he's a new tool user. As in not experienced. Don't be a jerk.
I assumed that he built the thing he wants to repair - maybe I'm wrong.
So, let's see ....
1) A better tape measure - no requirement to be experienced to use this.
2) A steadier hand at cutting - just a good eye required.
3) A method to double-check your work - you don't double check your work?
4) An electric planer with a lot of blades - this is the only tool I mentioned that may require a modicum of experience to operate.
It appears to me that if operating a tape measure and an electric planer is elitist then someone is in a world of hurt!
 

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dlb said:
I assumed that he built the thing he wants to repair - maybe I'm wrong.
So, let's see ....
1) A better tape measure - no requirement to be experienced to use this.
2) A steadier hand at cutting - just a good eye required.
3) A method to double-check your work - you don't double check your work?
4) An electric planer with a lot of blades - this is the only tool I mentioned that may require a modicum of experience to operate.
It appears to me that if operating a tape measure and an electric planer is elitist then someone is in a world of hurt!
So you had no learning curve, huh? You picked up your tape measure and started building beautiful quality family heirlooms right from the jump? We should all be so fortunate.

Everyone has to start somewhere. The mistakes I've made - both in carpentry and in life in general - have been the best teachers.

Don't let rude remarks get you down dude. Also, a lot of guys have suggested a circular saw. This is a very doable option, but running a circ saw horizontally in a nice straight line is a tricky thing to do. If you're going to use one, I'd highly recommend attaching a straight edge to the deck railing to act as a saw guide. Just my .02
 

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Mount a guide board / strait edge to run a skill saw along for a perfect cut. do it on the inside of the deck w/ the depth set for just the upright's thickness. Finish the ends where the skill saw cannot reach with a handsaw or careful use of a sawzall / handsaw.

I would simply snap a line and cut it by hand w/ the depth set but typically cutting horizontal or in some weird spot doesn't come out great unless it's something you do a lot.
 
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