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I've been using regular lead pencils for marking Red Oak. Kind of difficult to see and erase. I tried a white pencil but not a whole lot better. I've seen white chalk used....but how to get a thin line?
What do you folks use and recommend?
Thank You.
 

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Seems many of the YT experts use a pen for marking. See Rob Cosman and others. Never thought that was a good idea, but they certainly know more than I do about woodworking. Like most, I have used all of the aforementioned marking methods and sometimes use a combination, like following up a marking knife or marking gauge with a pencil to make the line more pronounced.
 

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Two different things — labelling ans layout. They are totally different and require different marking instruments.

Layout—a pencil is best, always use a knife or marking gauges for the most accurate joinery. Knife lines are far more accurate, reduces saw or router tear out, and give registration for a chisel.

If you’re sanding well enough pencil lines come off. In fact some people run squiggle lines over the board just to make sure they’ve sanded evenly. Be careful of certain thin leaded mechanical pencils, like the ones you have to use with those ridiculous Oncra marking gauges 😜 —. they can actually put a groove in soft wood!

Labelling—I usually use chalk to layout rough cuts. I do not recommend wax. I’ve learned some very hard lessons using lumber crayons! You can also simply use tape and a marker, keep in mind tape can come off. Side note once parts are cut to rough length ready to mill, I label the ends of the boards with a Sharpie, this way they stay with the board!

Youtubers use pens and markers for visual effects. However I think I‘ve seen Cosman use a red pen - never figured that one out!
 

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I've been using regular lead pencils for marking Red Oak. Kind of difficult to see and erase. I tried a white pencil but not a whole lot better. I've seen white chalk used....but how to get a thin line?
What do you folks use and recommend?
Thank You.
I use a 0,7 mechanical pencil. I use mostly black HB lead or sometimes white or red. You can erase most pencil marks with a spot of acetone dabbed on a paper towel. When finished erasing your mis-marks, put the towel or rag in your closed metal rag trash container. For really fine lines, I use a 0.5 mechanical pencil. They are harder to see.

For veneers and inlays, an X-acto knife. There are several good blade shapes that work well as held against templates or straight edges.

For mortice & tenon framing, I use a marking guage with a mechanical pencil or knife scribe.

For panels, I use a panel guage with a knife scribe.

For rough lumber dimensioning, I use a lumber crayon or carpenters flat pencil.

For marking the ends of lumber in racks, I use a sharpie.
 

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This is how you mark oak for layout. I love watching this guy work. No talking, only really fine woodworking by a craftsman. I like that he mixes traditional methods with modern woodworking machines. Beautiful shop too.

 
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